Author Topic: The friendly corner of the internet  (Read 213 times)

TC Chris

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The friendly corner of the internet
« on: July 12, 2018, 08:03:55 PM »
I read an article today by a woman whose hobby, pottery, led her to what she called a "saner, friendlier corner of the internet."  Unlike most social media experiences, she found that her hobby groups valued "collaboration, persistence and shared ingenuity."  There was no arguing about political issues or attempts to sound smarter than everybody else. The people in the hobby groups are "folks who are only too happy to help you learn whatever you are trying to master."

This group came to mind right away.  I don't recall ever seeing a snarky comment or an attempt to make anybody feel stupid.  Instead, we all get help when we ask for it.  Will Rogers said, "We are all ignorant, just on different subjects."  The older I get, the more I find that I don't know.  But then, there are also the things I do know but once didn't, and those are the things to share.

You can read the whole article here:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/11/technology/online-hobbyists-faith-internet.html?hpw&rref=technology&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&module=well-region&region=bottom-well&WT.nav=bottom-well

Chris Campbell

ed from Baltimore

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2018, 12:30:00 AM »
    You are so right Chris.  Contrast this forum with the typical forum one runs across when tying to solve difficult car problems. Besides the politics, there seem to be running Hatfield and McCoy type feuds among some of the senior members. You can usually find the answer to your problem, if you use the right words in the search engines in the right order, but you must wade through tons of downright strange solutions by crackpots. And everyone seems to be itching for a fight.

    I look forward to reading every post every day that I have a working computer in front of me. Even if it's on a topic I have a marginal interest in, the posts are so friendly that you wouldn't think of skipping a category. The Buick car club was like that too, and I'll have to start hunt up their club meets. They always were the same time of year as my September-October time at the beach, same as the Greek festival which I tried to never miss, even though I'm Italian. Sadly, being retired doesn't make it any easier to make it to all these activities.

walyfd

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2018, 04:33:44 AM »
Agreed.  So far, so good...  I was a moderator on my car club site and was very busy.  It degraded with new posters that I finally had to step down.  I haven't even logged onto it now in about a year.

Life is too short to VOLUNTARILY subject yourself to negativity. 


Motorola Minion

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2018, 01:54:56 PM »
This is the most civil group among antique radio and audio forums. Most of us want to see as much found-restored-preserved as possible. I don't care if you have a Fisher or an imported console, its all interesting :D.
Tubes - Magical - Tubes

Dave

walyfd

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2018, 05:09:29 PM »
THEM'S FIGHTIN' WERDZ!!!  I GOTZ A FISHER...  WANNA MAKE SUMPTIN' OUTTA IT?????

I think we're all on the same page that ANY surviving console is a treasure.  We all grew up with one in the house or knew someone who had one.  Like a vintage car, they evoke a happier, simpler time.  The car was in the garage or driveway.  The console was in the house.  Maybe you had a tv, too...  some families only had music.

Look at the quality of some cabinets.  You can't find anything in furniture like some of these.  Add electronics and speakers and they're a living thing...  designed to be a part of the decor.

Obviously, provincial isn't everyone's taste but it was popular in the day.  I personally don't like leather seats in a car and have been berated on my car forum for it.  To each their own.  I'm not buying a car or console to please anyone but me!!!  But we do respect each other's toys and that makes it all good!

TC Chris

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2018, 06:39:10 PM »
On the subject of car clubs and sites...  I'm getting ready to hire somebody to restore my '38 Buick (I've owned it since 1966) and need some help getting my '61 Chevy to start.  If anybody can point me to good info sources, please do.

For the Buick, I stopped in to chat with the owner of a shop that's about 3 miles from where the Buick has been tucked away. I've been driving by that shop for years (usually on weekends) and noticed that it's very clean and neat.  So when i had a weekday available, I stopped in to discuss the project.  The guy will come to view the Buick in a couple weeks when I;m there on a weekday again. They have been working on a '57 T'bird and he showed a bunch of photos. I was impressed that he and his guys didn't approve of earlier sheet metal work and were re-doing it.  The clean shop? "That's how I do things."

For the Chevy, I need to find another set of eyes and brain cells in the vicinity where it lives.  It's got new tires, brakes, and exhaust, and is insured.  All it needs to do is start.  I'm out of ideas.

Chris Campbell

walyfd

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2018, 07:11:11 PM »
Where do you live and are there shows or cruises... an AACA region nearby...

Much like electronics and my first lesson is that there are very few quality people to do work.  I was BURNED by a well-known New England totl shop with the console.  I ended up doing it myself.

Same with the car... almost, anyway.  The '57 hydra matic  was only slightly better than the '56.  Transmission dies in my '57 2 months after I get the car.  Take it to the oldest shop in the area.  He takes over 2 months to get it back to me and it was never right.  Kept driving it since I kinda gave up.  Took it to another shop.  Told him I want a FULL REBUILD.  You don't need that...  he fartz around and charged another  $800....  got so bad the car wouldn't coast.

Then I'm referred to a shop by a local Packard owner.  Said I better get the car in soon as these guys are retiring or dying.  Car is in the shop the day I took it down.  Older guy named Gino is working on  it.  Fingers like sopresata, about 5 feet tall and 4 wide. 

"Who the hell was in this tranny?  Bushings are backwards, there's missing seals, front sprag is for a '58..." knew his stuff... 

Guess my point is just ask around.  Sometimes a local hobbiest is better than a shop.  ANY shop that won't look at the original shop manual doesn't care...  you have a fuel delivery and/or electric problem. 

Did you ever get it to cough?  Try starting fluid?  Check for spark on a pulled plug?  Replace points or condenser? 

danrclem

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2018, 11:19:39 PM »
I have thought the same thing about this being the most civilized forum that I've been on.  I have read one comment that I think was rude but it's amazing that it's been only one.

I like learning and if I'm wrong I don't mind being told so as long as it's done right. 

Great bunch of people here in my opinion.   ;)

ed from Baltimore

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2018, 12:07:39 AM »
     I had an old 59 GM fin-mobile and the shear pin had sheared internally where the helical gear attached to the distributor  shaft. It had slipped position a bit and the rotor was pointing to the wrong spark plug. It would crank and crank without the least sign of catching.
      So check to see if the no.1 spark plug wire is actually the one that the rotor  points at when the timing mark is  lined up with the pointer on the engine crank pulley when rotating the engine by hand. It drove me crazy because there was spark and fuel yet never even coughed once.
     It was a 59 Cadillac  I had as a teenager some 45 years ago. When I fixed it and it actually started I was so thrilled that I roared up the street to hear the four barrels open up. Suddenly at peak revs, the engine coughed and died.  Opening the hood nervously and fearing some kind of horrible engine meltdown, I saw this huge wad of hood insulation choking the top of the carburetor. I had not bothered to put the air cleaner back on because I had wanted  hear the four barrels all the louder and didn't realize how close the hood sat to the carburetor top on these low to the ground late fifties cars.
     Good luck.

walyfd

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2018, 04:45:48 AM »
I was on my way to the Macungie car show one year and the car bucked, coughed and died on the hiway.  Distributor wire was hitting the rotor and wore through.  Another time, the water pump exploded.  And another time, the right front brake dragged from a stuck wheel cylinder and the brake lining disintegrated and burned the tire!!!

The joys of old cars.  At least they're easy to work on.  I can actually find do parts more easily for the '57 coupes DE villa than the '91 brougham.  The cash for clunkers really did a job on collectors of the last rwd cars.

ed from Baltimore

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2018, 07:04:23 AM »
   I heard a weird story about the cash for clunkers program.
     They were required to pour some goop into the engine that hardened and made it impossible to use the engine again to make sure people weren't fixing whatever the problem was that made the car a clunker and putting it back on the road.
       The seized engine couldn't be  rotated so you couldn't access all the flywheel to torque converter bolts and separate the transmission from the engine. So no junkyards would take the clunkers as they were useless for parts. Has anyone heard the same thing or was someone pulling my leg ?
       Come to think of it you could press out the locater cotter pin that prevented the transmission case from rotating with respect to the engine block and get at the bolts that way, but everything had to be out of the car for that. The engine would still be useless for parts though.
         

electra225

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2018, 09:10:20 AM »
They put liquid glass in engines for the cash for clunkers program. 

Chris, any relatively competent mechanic over 50 should be able to troubleshoot your Chevy.  You need fuel, air, spark and compression, IN TIME, and it will run.  You Chevy is missing one or more of those elements.  We are talking a 283 Chevy V-8 for pity's sake.  If it sat for years and still have the original timing gears with plastic teeth, there is a good chance it jumped time when you tried to start it.  You have done enough to it that it should at least cough or backfire when you try to start it.  No response whatsoever tells me there is no compression.  Either really dry holes or it is massively out of time.  A compression check is what I would do first. 
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

TC Chris

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2018, 12:59:24 PM »
They put liquid glass in engines for the cash for clunkers program. 

Chris, any relatively competent mechanic over 50 should be able to troubleshoot your Chevy.  You need fuel, air, spark and compression, IN TIME, and it will run.  You Chevy is missing one or more of those elements.  We are talking a 283 Chevy V-8 for pity's sake.  If it sat for years and still have the original timing gears with plastic teeth, there is a good chance it jumped time when you tried to start it.  You have done enough to it that it should at least cough or backfire when you try to start it.  No response whatsoever tells me there is no compression.  Either really dry holes or it is massively out of time.  A compression check is what I would do first.

Well, I did put the timing light on it and it showed right-on, so the distributor rotor is rotating and the timing should be right.  And since the timing chain drives the cam which drives the distributor rotor, the crankshaft and valves and distributor are all in sync. 

I squirted loads of oil into the cylinders, using a copper tube so I could aim at the upper edge of the pistons, all before using the homemade strap wrench to turn it over before cranking with the tarter motor, then added more later.  My theory was that it would prevent scoring and also increase compression.  I'm trying to avoid another flatbed ride to a repair shop @ $70.

My brother will be visiting soon and maybe I'll try again then--easier with two people.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2018, 01:24:56 PM »
You can't get enough speed at cranking speed to do much good with a timing light.  And, being 60 years old, the possibility that the ring on the crank pulley has slipped should be considered.  Take the LH valve cover off and rotate the engine to exact top dead center.  On #1 cylinder, both valves should be closed, (on the compression stroke) the piston at the top of the stroke and the distributor should point to #1 spark plug wire.  You should feel a puff of compression when you get to TDC.  This done and verified, then check the timing marks on the crank pulley or harmonic balancer.  With what you just posted being accurate, you should get some response from the engine, if only a fart.  With a valve cover (s) removed, you can also see if the valves are moving.  You could have one or more stuck open valves. 

If you had the car taken to a shop and they could not diagnose a no-start on a 283 Chevy, you should find a different shop.   ;)

Has anybody done a compression test, wet and dry with leakdown? 

The problem has got to be something basic and simple.  Good luck
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

walyfd

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Re: The friendly corner of the internet
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2018, 04:10:22 PM »
Harmonic balancers can go slightly off with age.  Timing chains and gears can wear and get sloppy.  I've also heard of distributors being reinstalled backwards so finding TDC is essential.

It should at least sputter, though.