Author Topic: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"  (Read 181 times)

electra225

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Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« on: November 10, 2018, 10:47:25 AM »
Last evening's episode of "Hawaii Five-O" found McGarrett and gang investigating the disappearance and murder of a young woman that took place in 1932.  The Five-O task force "went back in time" to investigate the incident.  The show was set in December, 1941, prior to, and on the day of, the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.  The point of this post is to comment on the cars they used in this episode.  McGarrett and Danny drove a Ford police car.  Unfortunately, the car they used was a 1946-'48 edition with a wrinkled headliner and an automatic transmission controlled by a chrome shifter, none of which would have been available in 1941.  The "bad guy's" car was a "Fleetmaster" , a Chevrolet model, again 1946-'48 vintage, with dual exhausts and an ill-fitting hood.  It would bark the tires when its automatic transmission shifted.  A real Chevrolet of that vintage would NEVER squeak the tires shifting, powered by a 216 stovebolt six and vacuum-shifted three on the tree.  McGarrett's Ford cop car,after being riddled with "Tommy gun" fire chased the Fleetmaster until it crashed into a 1968 to '72 Chevrolet C-50 truck.  I realize shows use prop cars that are not 100% authentic, but getting it this far off is aggravating and detracts from the othewise interesting story line.  The wife says I am being picky and that it is only a TV show. 
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

TC Chris

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2018, 01:34:52 PM »
I roll my eyes at anachronisms too.  And I hate to see cars wrecked just for a movie, when here in Michigan they would be rare.  But maybe the reason they used wrong-era cars and ones with visible defects is that they were beat up to start with, and resurrected just enough by the props people to look good on TV before they crashed.  It would be even sadder to see pre-war cars wrecked.

And while we're on cars... We've had the first real snowfall--accumulation and snowplows--and I will have to drive south the ransom the Chevy on Tuesday night.  So today I put the snow tires on the truck, a couple weeks early.  Then I went to the gas station to add air to all of them.  All 6 came up to 30 lbs. and I went home.  When I took the second regular tire out of the bed to stash it in the garage, it didn't bounce.  Uh-oh.  No air.  It had 30 lbs. in it just 15 minutes earlier. Off to the tire store for a fix.  There was much grumbling, shall we say.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2018, 02:06:03 PM »
I have never owned a set of snow tires for a car.  I drove Buicks back in the day that were the worst cars to drive on snow and slick roads that were ever invented.  They had more power than traction, something you do not need on bad roads.  If you had a Buick with Positraction, you would end up in the ditch on the opposite side of the road that you steered it toward.  Snow tires would not help.  Dad always ran Kelly mud grips on his pickup.  He would fill the bed with firewood for the winter to give him more traction.  He drove a 1960 six-cylinder Chevy pickup for years.  Spinning the wheels was not a problem with it.


Around here, people carry tire chains in their car if they are going to the high country skiing or whatever.  Never owned nor intend to own a set of those.


Back to the "show car" topic, I noticed that in the close-up shots in Perry Mason, cars do not have a windshield.  Further away shots they do.


I noticed in the Five-O episode I mentioned, the bad guy who killed the girl owned a Rolls Royce.  It was found, buried behind the house in a swimming pool excavation site.  The car body was in good shape, the fenders were rusted, the corpse was sitting upright at the steering wheel and the seat upholstery was in good shape.  All this after being buried since 1932 with no right hand door on it.   ::)
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

walyfd

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2018, 02:51:28 PM »
Gee...  makes this car-collecting undertaker wonder how they accomplished that--Lexol?

Cars are one huge peeve with me...  the way the deceased are represented and the inaccuracies just makes me ill...

I've always wondered who's signing all those death certificates and burial permits on soap operas?  Best deal is burying empty caskets!!! 

ed from Baltimore

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2018, 03:02:38 PM »
    Do you mean the old B&W Perry Masons with Raymond Burr ? Never noticed the missing windshields I will have to look. Perry had neat cars--57 Ford Skyliner retractable hardtop, 58 Cadillac conv.  59 slanted headlamps Lincoln, 59 Cadillac conv, Kennedy era Continentals, finally 65 Cadillac. Paul Drake had Thunderbirds or Corvettes.

        A modern day version of a post Dec 7 1941 WWII detective radio show had the show centering  around a stolen Norden Bombsight and another one a stolen radar magnetron as if there were no war secrets.

TC Chris

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2018, 03:09:16 PM »
I have never owned a set of snow tires for a car.  I drove Buicks back in the day that were the worst cars to drive on snow and slick roads that were ever invented.  They had more power than traction, something you do not need on bad roads.  If you had a Buick with Positraction, you would end up in the ditch on the opposite side of the road that you steered it toward. 

There's probably a generational divide in Michigan.  The kids who grew up with FWD and 4WD don't know how to drive a RWD car.  (Nor a manual transmission). Long ago I read that you accelerate as though there were an egg between your foot and the pedal.  It works.  I drove a 425 cubic inch '65 Olds Starfire for quite a few years and once managed to get home while other cars were being abandoned in the streets because of snow.  Had to steer around them and run red lights to avoid stopping. I did get stuck in the driveway, but I was home.  When I moved "up north," a Michigan concept, I finally bought snow tires.  My first Ranger also came with some truck-bed sandbags for rear weight and traction.  Every couple years I wrap them in a new sheet of black polyethylene.  I built a little frame to hold them over the axle.  They're not in place yet because tomorrow I have to drive out of town to pick up a couple oak barrels for my sister, and those will tend to fill up the bed.   My brother in Wyoming keeps chains because they'll set up roadblocks in some places and not let you through without chains, and also because they work in those conditions you didn't expect to be out in.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2018, 03:34:03 PM »

How did they prop the corpse up?


I'd guess the prop department had something to do with it.  There was no dirt in the interior of the car, either.  I can't keep the inside of my car clean.  Maybe burying it in the backyard would help?


I had not noticed no windshields in Perry Mason, either.  I was watching an early episode, when Perry was driving a Cadillac.  There was a close-up of the bad guy who had a Chrysler product of some kind.  There was no windshield in it.  You could actually see the gasket still there, sagging in the middle of the opening.  I remember watching Lucille Ball driving a '55 Pontiac.  It did not have a windshield, either.  If you look at the Andy Griffith show, they left the windshield in, but they dulled all the chrome and brightwork on the sheriff's car he drove.


Chris, dad always said if you take off "in second" you won't be so apt to spin your wheels.  I hated straight stick transmissions.  I had trouble taking off in low.  How I managed to drive a truck for so many years with a 13-speed transmission is beyond me.  Most of Walmart's trucks are automatics. 


Straight 8 Buicks with Dynaflow were pretty good on snow.  The V-8's were horrible.  Too peppy of an engine.  The old long-stroke straight 8's did not rev as quick and had good low-end torque.




I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

TC Chris

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2018, 03:51:24 PM »
The '68 Mustang that Steve McQueen drove in Bullit had its whole finish dulled.  Still is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxhjuTqqqls

One of the coolest cars ever....

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2018, 04:05:48 PM »
Have you seen the 2019 version of the Bullitt?  They had an article on it, I think in Car and Driver.  Only available in dark green or black.  It is powered by a detuned version of the Voodoo flat plain V-8.
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

walyfd

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2018, 04:34:54 PM »
Most studios removed the glass from cars and actually slathered them in Vaseline or some other grease to dull them for daylight shots.  Watch "Peter Gunn" with all those Chrysler products at night and always on wet streets...  it accents the lines and reflections of the car.  But they all have windows.

A member of my club supplied Boolie's Eldorado Broughton in "Driving Miss Daisy".  It's the same car the Franklin mint used for the model.  He said they wouldn't touch one thing on the car without his or an agents consent.  Back in the day, though, a studio would as a car company or even a dealer to sponsor the show and supply the cars.  It seems like black and white didn't work well with glass reflection especially in "day" light.  So glass was removed and finishes were dulled.  Never noticed that practice on color shows...

AstroSonic100

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #10 on: November 10, 2018, 06:53:06 PM »
Currently watching some of the old Highway Patrol TV shows.  The episode I watched today was from 1957.  Must have been filmed right after the cars for 1958 were introduced.  They had a 1958 Dodge Coronet decked out in California Highway Patrol trim.  Also a 1957 Mercury Monterey in Highway Patrol trim. A 1958 Belveder and a 1957 Ford Sunliner convertible.

Highway Patrol was low budget and they were filmed in various locations in Los Angeles. Occasionally there is a Pacific Electric street car that is shown in the background.
 You can see older cars from the late 30s through the current year the episode was filmed.  It was very interesting to see how a three to four year old car looked dated compared to the sleek new offerings for 1957 and 1958.  And with each passing year, there were less 30s and pre-war II cars on the road.
Brings back memories of my childhood growing up in the L.A. area.


Ray

electra225

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2018, 07:14:14 PM »
The producers of Highway Patrol did not remove the windshields nor did they dull the chrome.  Wonder how their filming was different than some of the other shows.
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

TC Chris

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #12 on: November 10, 2018, 09:19:42 PM »

Brings back memories of my childhood growing up in the L.A. area.

My friend in L.A. knows my Chevy and has been following my accounts of the resurrection.  He sent me a photo he snapped today at McDonald's. Odds are that the one in the photo didn't have to endure three teenage boys driving it and it surely didn't have to endure Michigan's annual doses of salt.  I'm jealous.  It's a handsome vehicle.  Of course, California has its own hazards, like getting low-ridered or burning up.

Chris Campbell

ed from Baltimore

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #13 on: November 10, 2018, 11:03:10 PM »
   Really a nice-looking car in that picture. I like cars in the early sixties. Sculptured side metal instead of bloated rounded metal. years before the coke  bottle rear fenders with GM. before federal mandated bumpers and side marker lamps.  before razor edge 70's styling where even the headlights were edged. they were modest with the fins and chrome after the horrible 58's. you could still tell car makes apart from each other.  compare a 58 thru 60 Cadillac to a 61 or 62.
    First I'd heard of intentional dulling of car paint and chrome The guy I bought my 56 Roadmaster from (black 4 door sedan) said they used it in the  Barry Levinson movie Diner and they coated it with a dulling finish all over-glass, chrome and paint.  I thought it was a Barry Levinson thing or they just didn't want a street car to be gleaming polish to steal the scene, but from what you said, the all did that even with a non-chromesaurus  later models.
      Black lacquer and good chrome really gleam on a bright sunny day

TC Chris

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Re: Old cars on "Hawaii Five-O"
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2018, 11:18:19 PM »
When we got the sailboat in 1968 we were the third owners--the first ones had it for several years, then a second guy who sold it quickly.  He explained that the dull paint on the top was on purpose so it didn't blind the eyes with reflected summer sun.  They had painted it just before the evening dew so it would be dull.  I remember rolling my eyes to myself at that tale.  Those first owners were spectacularly inept painters, apparently favoring a trowel instead of brush or roller.  Maybe they applied that deck paint with an old carpet or something.  The movie makers would like the end result.

It still makes my skin crawl to think about taking steel wool to that Bullitt Mustang.

Chris Campbell