Author Topic: Looking For Comedy, Found Music  (Read 63 times)

19and41

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Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« on: October 11, 2019, 04:37:07 PM »
I got a notice that a 5 DVD set of comedy programs was discounted on Ebay.  I went ahead and got it and found it contains a shed load of Glenn miller's airchecks from 1938 to 1945.  They have a lot of material that hadn't appeared on any of the commercial albums.  A few programs were mp3'd to death, but most are as good as a good 78.  Really good stuff.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke

Bill

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Re: Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2019, 07:33:19 PM »
Sounds interesting.  Anything Glenn Miller is always good.  At least that's my opinion.

Bill


19and41

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Re: Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2019, 09:52:18 PM »
The earliest ones were their Paradise restaurant dates with his early second band.  The first one he had formed for Ray Noble he took over and he disbanded in 1937.  It was the one that recorded "Solo Hop" that I linked in the music forum here.  When he got the chance to play at the frowsy Paradise, he jumped at the chance for the NBC hookup they had.  They go at it hammer and tongs in these recordings.  It bought him more weekly broadcasts and he was off.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

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Re: Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2019, 10:08:45 PM »
A few programs were mp3'd to death, but most are as good as a good 78.  Really good stuff.

It's easy to forget that the limiting factor on 78 rpm fidelity was the physical medium--the shellac-with-filler  that makes them all hissy.  The higher speed is actually capable of higher fidelity than 33-1/3.  New high-end recordings are often offered at 45 rpm for that reason.

When I was in high school my buddy's parents were in the amateur theater group that owned an old movie theater.  Up in the projection booth was a set of two Simplex amplifiers for the movie sound (one always ready as backup). There were two big electrodynamic speakers alongside the stage, and an old 78 rpm turntable up in the projection booth.  There was a 78 of the Gillette theme song, "Look Sharp, Be Sharp" with the Boston Pops.  It sounded surprisingly good in that auditorium.

Here's that recording that somebody posted on YouTube.  I've still got the 78 I heard there but it does have a crack now.  The YouTube version is better than mine.

(Any advice about gluing a cracked shellac 78??)

The cool old Simplex carbon-arc projectors were still up there then but eventually made their way to the scrap yard.  I had pondered snagging one of them but they disappeared before I could make the maneuver.

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2019, 09:35:32 PM »
The other series offered on the discs are pretty good too.  I put You Bet Your Life on adrive and have been playing it going to and from work.  It's fun to guess the answers.  Some never age, some are the government officials of the period (it's 1947-49 now)
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke

19and41

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Re: Looking For Comedy, Found Music
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2019, 09:48:41 PM »
A few programs were mp3'd to death, but most are as good as a good 78.  Really good stuff.

It's easy to forget that the limiting factor on 78 rpm fidelity was the physical medium--the shellac-with-filler  that makes them all hissy.  The higher speed is actually capable of higher fidelity than 33-1/3.  New high-end recordings are often offered at 45 rpm for that reason.

When I was in high school my buddy's parents were in the amateur theater group that owned an old movie theater.  Up in the projection booth was a set of two Simplex amplifiers for the movie sound (one always ready as backup). There were two big electrodynamic speakers alongside the stage, and an old 78 rpm turntable up in the projection booth.  There was a 78 of the Gillette theme song, "Look Sharp, Be Sharp" with the Boston Pops.  It sounded surprisingly good in that auditorium.

Here's that recording that somebody posted on YouTube.  I've still got the 78 I heard there but it does have a crack now.  The YouTube version is better than mine.

(Any advice about gluing a cracked shellac 78??)

The cool old Simplex carbon-arc projectors were still up there then but eventually made their way to the scrap yard.  I had pondered snagging one of them but they disappeared before I could make the maneuver.

Chris Campbell

The gluing of a cracked 78 has got me thinking.  First you would have to clamp it to bring the crack together tightly.I would make a jig to hold the disc flat and have screws around the disc with rubber tubing around them that would expand the tubing as the screws were tightened.  Then, relying on the disk being made from shellac, I would apply at least 91% iso alcohol through a hypodermic needle from the edge to make it flow into the crack with capillary action.  Alcohol is a solvent for shellac.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke