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Messages - TC Chris

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 136
1
Chat / Re: OT: cleaning the 4GC carburetor
« on: Today at 12:30:11 PM »
Thanks for the endorsement of the two filters in series theory.  I'll be putting them in next weekend.  Otherwise, the engine is all new.  New ignition components.  Recored radiator.  Rebuilt generator (it lasted about a month after the rebuild and then went on strike: I pulled it and had a local shop rebuild).  What's old is that gas tank and its crud.  Yeah, this is my old car's introduction to new gas.  Or fake gas.

Chris Campbell

2
Tube Consoles / Re: Another orphan followed me home
« on: Today at 12:24:38 PM »
P.S. I made the holes oversize on purpose so they would step back a bit from the holes for the speakers in the console.

Chris Campbell

3
Tube Consoles / Re: Another orphan followed me home
« on: Today at 12:23:16 PM »
Pretty day in Michigan now, but this a.m. there was no wind so I put off going sailing.  Instead I cut the grille cloth holders, which I'm going to call baffle boards even though they aren't.  I cut them to size then cut the holes, remembering to make them mirror-image instead of identical.  Then I sanded a bit to radius the edges and gave them a couple coats of flat-black paint so they disappear under the grille cloth.  That will have to wait for next weekend.  But here are the boards, drying in the sun.

Let's see... yesterday, cleaned & reassembled carburetor.  Today, cut & painted baffle boards.  Now I deserve to go sailing.

Chris Campbell

4
I have a sailboat with mahogany drop-boards to close off the companionway.  They've sometimes been a bit sticky in their channel, especially the one with a little warp, so I bought some ultra-high molecular weight (UHMW) plastic tape from (pause for brain fart--can't remember company name) one of the online industrial suppliers.  Makes it very slippery, and it's thin.  I has to cut it down in width to fit the slots on the boat but it has been durable.  It's clear and doesn't show.  Can't recall the plastic type-polyethylene, I think.  UHMW-PE.  You'll know the industrial suppliers; my brain just doesn't respond quickly to names.

Chris Campbell

5
Chat / Re: OT: cleaning the 4GC carburetor
« on: Today at 11:18:04 AM »
My two new filters are both clear housings so I can monitor what comes up.

As to alternative diagnoses, Greg had warned me about vacuum leaks too.  I had sorta ignored that because of the new engine rebuild.  But when I was pulling the carb off, I did find that the brake vacuum booster hose was a loose fit at the carb end and missing its clamp. I bought a new clamp, but suspect that the rusty goo in the carb was the real issue because the car had run fine until I (1) ran low on gas and (2) dumped a bunch of gas in at the gas station pump, probably stirring things up.

Right now I am cutting new speaker-grille boards for the little Home-Mark console.

Chris Campbell

6
Chat / Re: OT: cleaning the 4GC carburetor
« on: Today at 09:55:37 AM »
I didn't quite rebuild it yesterday, having done that fairly recently.  I just took it apart, blew the rusty mud out, and reassembled.  It had been clean when the engine got rebuilt less than 500 miles ago. 

There's a new fuel pump sitting in a box in the trunk.  The rebuilder couldn't find one that he approved of so he left the old one on.  I got a new GM device online, just in case.

My plan is to get the car running again and try to get the tank cleaned ASAP.  But I need to be able to drive it to the shop or it will be another $70 tow bill.  So my thinking is to run two inline filters in series

The one question I forgot to ask--what's the pre-set for the idle mixture screws?   had in mind 1-1/4 turns out, although maybe it's 1-1/2 turns.  Anybody remember?

Chris Campbell

7
I vote for the new look!

Chris Campbell

8
Tube Consoles / Re: Another orphan followed me home
« on: July 20, 2019, 09:12:06 PM »
Today was the day for projects because rain threatened.  At the car parts place, the clerk said everybody had been in earlier to best the rain.  But it didn't actually hit until I was almost finished cleaning the old carburetor and almost ready to put it back together (of course).  While taking the carb off the Chevy, I was in the garage where the little console sits.  I found an old sheet of Masonite, not tempered but 1/8", and  held the "new" cloth of to have a look.  Wow, looks just right!  Pretty close to hat was there, and the brown tone suits the wood finish.  I measured fr size again and for placement of the holes for the speakers. Maybe tomorrow, maybe the next week I'll get it cut. I swung past the hardware store to buy some flat black paint for the new boards under the cloth.

Chris Campbell

9
Chat / OT: cleaning the 4GC carburetor
« on: July 20, 2019, 09:04:10 PM »
OK, car fans, gimme advice.  The Chevy barely made it back to the garage last time, so today I pulled the carb and took it apart.  There was rust-brown mud, very fine particles, everywhere.  But before seeing that, I stopped at the auto parts store and bought two in-line filters to replace the one I had used before, and also a new bronze filter to replace the original GM device in the carburetor.  The store's computer said the inline paper filters stop stuff at 12 microns, pretty tiny.  The bronze one is rated at 40 microns.   I was kinda hoping that two filters in series would keep enough crud out of the carburetor to hold me over until I can get it into the shop for a gas tank pull--and maybe avoid another disassembly and clean out.  I'm not sure how the brown mud got in if the filter really is good for 12 microns.  But there it was, everywhere in the carb.

Questions:  Are two filters in series going to work, not creating too much resistance for the mechanical fuel pump?  And is there a better filter option, something larger, finer, more capacity?  I think Greg mentioned a diesel filter--better?

And my comment:  I know the 4GC is disfavored, but taking it apart again reminded me how quite well-designed some of our old mechanical, analog systems were.  The automatic choke, the various valves for the secondary airflow, none of it using a computer.  And the old carb actually was trouble free for the years when it was a daily driver.  Those old engines were actually fairly complex and pretty effective, especially when considering that few drivers knew much other than where the gas goes and where the key goes.

Chris Campbelll

10
A great method is to leave a big flat bowl of ammonia--maybe drape a piece of plastic over it. Works to remove household odors too.  You don't smell the ammonia but it seems to absorb others.  If the smell is really bad, an ozone machine is good, too.  I've got an old small one, an unnoticed item in an auction pile.  Couldn't figure out what it was until I turned on the switch, heard the buzz, and smelled ozone.

Chris Campbell

11
That black grille cloth looks really cool!
As to grumpy, I had the take the carb off the Chevy today.  I hate fixing things twice.   More on that elsewhere.

Chris Campbell

12
Chat / Re: This forum is fun
« on: July 20, 2019, 06:30:22 PM »
A ca. 1950 Crosley table model, one that came with the summer cottage.  It has continuous tuning, like the old Dumonts.  Still have it in the collection.

Chris Campbell

13
The AM and FM bands share the same IF amps, ruling out Q6 and Q7.

I'm not an electronics engineer or even very gifted in theory, so I'll ask a slight OT question because I've always wondered.  When tuners use the same IF amps for AM and FM (different IF transformers, obviously), how much efficiency (sensitivity) is lost by having the "wrong" IF transformers in the circuit?  That is, when on FM, the 455kc IF cans aren't working, but they are there.  Same with AM and the 10.7 mHz cans.  Are the wrong ones sufficiently untuned that it's the equivalent of being switched out of the circuit?  High-end tuners usually have completely separate IF circuits.

Chris Campbell

14
Tube Consoles / Re: Another orphan followed me home
« on: July 17, 2019, 09:34:14 PM »
As you well know Chris, summer is the short season here in Michigan.  :( :(   So, I full agree with you, get the Chevy on the road and enjoy some cruising time.   :) :) :)

Bill

Summer arrived very late this year, and when it did, it was like somebody had flipped the "summer" switch to "on."  First it was cold & wretched, then it was hot and sunny.  I am lucky because I can wear shorts to work, most of the time.  After work, I really should do productive things, but then I remember that summer is WAY too short so I do summer things.  Like sailing tonight, shorts & t-shirt, listening to music on the boat's "hi-fi" system (see my "My Marine Hi-fi" post under Chat, with photos).  I'll be productive tomorrow, when it may rain.

Chris Campbell

15
Life isn't much fun without a sense of humor to cushion the disappointments, minor setbacks, and annoyances.  The humorless folks aren't much fun to be around.  Somebody on ARF was offended that I put the wrong speakers in the little console.  I was going to upset the carefully-engineered tonal balance, basically.  And my new speakers were for sealed enclosures so they'd be awful in open-back.  It would be a disaster.  But what I knew was that the wrong speakers were better AND cheaper, and if they didn't work, surely there would be another place for them.  And so far, they sound pretty damned good to me.  I've never quite caught on to condescension so I just reply in good faith.  It's not worth picking fights.  Don't let their problems get turned into yours.

Chris Campbell

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