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Messages - TC Chris

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1
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 17, 2018, 11:46:21 PM »
And I forgot to add that the Mustang's exhaust system has 145,000 miles on the original.  It's stainless and 99% of its life is on the highway at 60 mph. 

Chris Campbell

2
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 17, 2018, 11:44:14 PM »
Even unleaded fuel doesn't help much in preserving exhaust systems in cold-weather country if cars are driven often in short trips.  The moisture in exhaust gases condenses out and rots the system. On my previous Ranger, I took it to a "muffler shop" for exhaust work. Ever year something had to be replaced--one of the pipes, the muffler--and I'd spend a couple hours off work at the muffler shop.  Then I read a recommendation from the Magliozzi brothers in their newspaper column:  go to the dealer and get an OEM exhaust system; they're better and more durable.  So when the new Ranger's exhaust failed after about 7 years, I did that, and the 2nd Ford factory exhaust is still functioning.  It's cheaper overall and much more convenient not spending hours in the muffler shop.  The other thing that helped is that I started riding my bicycle to work year-round, which cuts out two short trips/weekday.

Chris Campbell

3
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 17, 2018, 01:02:10 PM »
Absolutely.  When my Chevy was new, if somebody had an aluminum, double overhead cam, 4 valve  per cylinder fuel-injected engine, it some sort of exotic racing engine.  Now it sits in my little pickup truck, about the least exotic form of transportation around.  And it starts and runs flawlessly after 153,000 miles with no service except for changing the plugs once. It even has the original 2005 battery, which gets little abuse since the engine starts so quickly.  The Chevy had 78,300 miles on the engine when it was rebuilt, and it was very tired.

Chris Campbell

4
Zenith Solid State Discussion / Re: Zenith YT960
« on: November 17, 2018, 11:14:44 AM »
You can always hide things. Put the switch around behind.  Make the installation reversible so you can remove it if necessary to preserve authenticity in the future.  My 1948 jukebox has its volume control behind the device.  It's not hard to reach around.  My parents' first TV, a 1953 Zenith console, originally had an aftermarket antenna selector screwed to the back.  The available stations were in different directions and the rooftop antenna mast had two devices on it.  Still have the TV.

Chris Campbell

5
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 17, 2018, 11:05:21 AM »
I bought a carb kit using the number on the triangular aluminum tag.  It came with instructions and specs from (I think) a GM publication. I also have the car's shop manual.  All I remember now is that the specs were called out in 64ths and the kit did not include cardboard jigs for measuring.  My eyes and fingers work in 16ths.  I made my own jigs finally after struggling with the carb parts & scale.  And then the rebuilder took it apart to verify.  The car runs beautifully when warm and not all that badly when cold--just when you make that left turn in front of the truck.  And that was with temps in the low 30s. 

The shop manual is back with the car.  I did a Google search for choke-setting instructions last night.  I'll try just rotating the bimetal choke spring a bit until the choke closes more when I visit the car at Thanksgiving--and, weather permitting, cruise around some. 

Chris Campbell

6
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 16, 2018, 11:43:10 PM »
No amount of fiddling with carburetion or other such details is going to make this into a fast car, as long as it's got Powerglide and the standard rear end.  Just ain't no way.  My goal is to have a pretty good mostly-stock vehicle that drives dependably and safely.  I do sort of wish I had called for a dual-braking conversion when I had the brake system replaced, but with all-new components it ought to be reliable in stopping.  The only car I've ever had brake failure problems with is the '65 Olds.  They must have pinched pennies on the rubber brake hoses, and the steel brake lines were inclined to rust too.  If I have an urge to go fast I can start up the Mustang.  I'll bet the 4-cylinder Ranger is faster off the line than the Chevy. 

My sister rode around in the Chevy and noticed that lots of people were smiling.  For many years I had a 1960 Rambler American station wagon, a little inverted bathtub of a car with an L-head 6 and a Flash-O-Matic three-speed automatic. (Geez, even Ramblers had three speeds when the Chevy still had two). It was from California and I got it for free when it sat abandoned for a year where I lived in Ann Arbor.  It was fun to drive because it made everybody smile.  That was quite remarkable. 

Chris Campbell

7
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 16, 2018, 06:12:17 PM »
Heat riser--you mean that little valve that runs exhaust gas up through the intake manifold?  No, I had it tied off to keep the dual exhaust from rotting out prematurely.  When I had the exhaust system replaced, the shop cut it out (must have been frozen open).  I didn't look to see if my rebuilder had replaced it.  I try to avoid short trips in all my vehicles, especially in cold weather and especially with dual exhausts. 

Chris Campbell

8
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 15, 2018, 11:29:49 PM »
My engine is basically new, and it runs perfectly when warm, so I'm going to blame the stumble on the carb mixture going lean when the throttle opens with not quite enough choke.  The rebuilder did warn me that the choke wasn't closing enough and that it might suffer a bit when cold.  I only let it get cold enough to behave that way once yesterday.  And it did until it warmed up.  I'll turn it toward rich, making sure it closes the choke and then see if the choke pulls off a little with manifold vacuum.  It will give me something to do.  Modern engines don't require much attention.  The Ranger interval for spark plug changes is 100,000 miles, for goodness' sake.  A least the old engines give us some reason to feel needed.

The best part is the silence of the valve train.  This old Chevy always had one of the lifters tapping and it defied adjustment.  I haven't examined the old lifters yet to see what they look like. 

Thanks for all the info.  I'll preserve it for future reference.

Chris Campbell

9
Magnificent Magnavox / Re: Lucked into a 1957 Magnavox Concert Grand
« on: November 15, 2018, 07:05:43 PM »
Wow, what a great find.  And that extension speaker--no tweeter, but a place for one in the upper left.  Interesting choices.  Congratulations!

Chris Campbell

10
Chat / Re: GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 15, 2018, 07:00:41 PM »
Rochester 4-Jet.  I rebuilt it two years ago.  I asked about that.  He had checked it.  Found one float catching on the bowl.  I grinned. So that's why it kept squirting gas.  Now it's verified as right-on.

Chris Campbell

11
Chat / GM car question for Greg, others
« on: November 15, 2018, 06:02:20 PM »
One thing my Chevy engine guy told me was that he couldn't find a new bimetal choke spring and that the old one wasn't closing the choke all the way.  Sure enough, it runs fine when warm but gives that lean-mix stumble  when you accelerate before it warms up.  Which is usually when you're turning left in front of a truck....

When I thought about it, I wondered why he didn't just rotate the little disc on the choke oven, the one with the lean-rich arrows.  That's what I've always done when I had a GM carbureted car with the stumbles.  Now maybe this spring isn't opening the choke all the way when it's warm, so that's why not, but I'm inclined to give it a try when  visit the car at Thanksgiving.  I can't ask Perry, who did the work, because he's in Florida on vacation.

Otherwise, the car runs flawlessly.   Perfectly.   Better than ever before.

Any helpful comments?

Chris Campbell

12
Phonographs / Re: Collaro turntable
« on: November 15, 2018, 05:53:48 PM »
When all else fails, I swear at it.

Next, I give the problem close study.  Watch how it cycles and what moves where. 

Chris Campbell

13
Magnificent Magnavox / Re: Magnavox Stereo Theater 1MR418M restoration
« on: November 14, 2018, 11:26:06 PM »

In vocational school I learned a little ditty that helped, but I can't print it here.

 :D

The same thing goes for marine navigation using a compass and chart.  There are ways to remember what you do when moving from true to magnetic to compass readings or back again.  Some are not suitable for polite company but they are memorable.

Chris Campbell

14
Chat / Re: Another car question
« on: November 14, 2018, 11:19:28 PM »
The other photos are too large to post and it's too late to resize tonight.  Maybe tomorrow.

Chris Campbell

15
Chat / Re: Another car question
« on: November 14, 2018, 11:13:30 PM »
Third try at stills. I think my sister's photos are too large.  Trying again, here's the guy who did all the work, Perry Tacey of PT's Auto Service, Bay City, MI.


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