Author Topic: Recommendations for fitting a magnetic cartridge into a micromatic tonearm.  (Read 3990 times)

Consoleman

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Re: Recommendations for fitting a magnetic cartridge into a micromatic tonearm.
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2016, 07:49:49 AM »
Nice find!
Mark

Alan Maier

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Re: Recommendations for fitting a magnetic cartridge into a micromatic tonearm.
« Reply #16 on: February 18, 2016, 11:40:51 AM »
The key reason for the ceramic was the flip-over stylus to allow playback of 78's. While Magnavox dropped the 78 speed for a short time, and they switched to a "T" shaped stylus - this was short lived due to buyer complaints.


I'd think they would have run a magnetic on the Custom Imperials, but as a total twist - those had *4* speed changers still!!! I have yet to figure that one out. They also had a special short control tower and did NOT have a light in it. The armoire models had a compartment light, the horizontal ones left you in the dark for both the changer and the reel to reel.  At least the tuner pulled out a few inches so you could use the controls without getting on your knees.

ha1156w

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Re: Recommendations for fitting a magnetic cartridge into a micromatic tonearm.
« Reply #17 on: February 14, 2018, 01:07:02 AM »
If it's any consolation, I have a Magnavox/Collaro 748 changer component, and it's 3 speed with an Audio Technica AT11? cartridge.  Standard 1/2" mount cartridge, but with 78??  They never offered a larger 78 stylus for that cartridge that I'm aware of.

ed from Baltimore

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I don't blame Magnavox for delaying switchover to magnetic cartridge, at least in the tube models. Look at what component makers did to help keep hum out of their magnetic pre-amp equipped chassis-------transformers completely enclosed and mounted totally above the chassis instead of half-shell in large cutouts.----all AC carrying wires dressed as twisted pairs-------floating filament windings with center tap or hum control connected to a positive  voltage (usually output tube cathode) instead of ground. -----all filament current through copper wire, not one side to chassis metal----aluminum chassis instead of magnetic steel---separate grounds on turnable, one from cartridge through cable shield to magnetic input jack , one from turntable frame  metal to chassis, one from rubber mounted motor frame to separate location on chassis near power transformer---- isolating RCA jack grounds from direct contact with chassis, copper straps around power transformer shell to short out magnetic field leaks. shock mounted preamp tube sockets, DC from output tube cathodes used as preamp tube filament voltage, metal shield plates under chassis separating power supply area from preamp---tube shields----wood enclosure under turntable cutout to isolate deep bass feedback. No wonder they put off the switch for "just one more year"  They had a lot to undo whereas a component maker doing a new design could incorporate the then-new modern magnetics such as Pickering and GE.     Plus the new ceramics were a big improvement over the old crystal cartridges.