Author Topic: Restoring Tuner Faces  (Read 681 times)

Nippersonic Sylvania

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 10
    • View Profile
Restoring Tuner Faces
« on: May 28, 2016, 01:58:06 PM »
Has anyone ever had much success restoring the face of a tuner? A few of the consoles I've got lined up for restoration could use some gently-applied silver paint in places where time has not been kind to the finish. I'm kind of curious what might be the best option to restore the paint, so if anyone has any ideas, I'd appreciate hearing them.

hermitcrab

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 40
    • View Profile
Re: Restoring Tuner Faces
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2016, 09:09:37 PM »
picture would help, my magnavox brass plate was worn where the knobs are... I used gold paint to cover the worn areas , did not march exact but from a distance you can't tell...
Elton

Larry H

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2642
  • Little Rock, Arkansas
    • View Profile
Re: Restoring Tuner Faces
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2016, 10:40:17 PM »
A lot of them are worn around the knobs, and they are always worse when operated by a woman with long fingernails.  I know of no way to restore one.  Only option is to find a junker set somewhere that has a good plate, and buy it just for the plate.
--Larry

electra225

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1534
    • View Profile
Re: Restoring Tuner Faces
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 07:39:29 AM »
The little stereo I'm currently re-doing the cabinet on has a spot on its tuner bezel that has a bare spot on it.  Larry's suggestion to just replace the bezel is the best one,

In my auto restoration days, it was fairly common to see paint missing from something that would show.  Around the ignition switch was a common place.  Buick would commonly paint the dash bezel "argent" which was their special formulation of silver paint.  Not really silver, but not gray, either.  I had a computer paint matching specialist mix up some argent paint for me and put it in spray bombs.  We would touch up the offending area, then sand or buff to match the gloss, which was actually satin, but has been polished with age.  This procedure worked well most of the time if the area was clean.  It is rife with pitfalls and if you messed up, you had to look for another piece. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....