Author Topic: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration  (Read 6080 times)

Bill

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2016, 07:18:51 AM »
Hey Ken,

I guess I have not experienced the NEW Turp as the small town hardware I deal with sells the good stuff. :)  Maybe it s Calif. thing???

And no I have not purchased the Stromberg Carlson...............Yet...........so don't come kick my butt, at least not just yet. 

Bill

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2016, 03:18:32 PM »
I finally got my furniture refinisher concoction strong enough to remove not only the oil finish, but also the glop that some knuckledragger squirted on this poor old stereo cabinet.  I'm not going to pretend to understand what motivated somebody to do such a thing, but they sure made a hell of a mess.  I found black spray paint on part of the cabinet and on the grille cloth on one speaker, so the grille cloth will have to be replaced regardless of anything else.  The sliding lids look really good after I removed the junk from them.  The water mark is 99% gone.  The rest is in the grain, and since I'm using black grain filler, I believe I can hide the remaining mark. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #32 on: June 10, 2016, 09:52:42 AM »
I have hit my first snag.  Bugtussle.  I live in Bugtussle, downtown Nowhere.  There is not a soul within 200 miles of here who has even heard of grain filler, let alone used it.  I'm going to have to drive to St. Louis to Rockler's to get the supplies I need.  Yeah, I know, order it online.  Phooey on that.  I want to stare into the face of the guy I give money to.  All I have around here are big box stores with their idiot personnel complement and some mom and pop paint stores who could give two hoots about what I'm trying to accomplish.  Grain filler around here to the old timers who refinish wood is shellac, lots of shellac.  This project is on hold until I can get supplies. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #33 on: June 27, 2016, 09:33:58 PM »
I have made progress, but have been too lazy to post pictures.  Let's see..

I solved some of my "Bugtussle" problems.  Some by mooching from a buddy, some by ordering online, something I would rather not do.  I basically have the cabinet to the final finish stage.  I am dividing the cabinet up into four sections, plus the sliding lids.  I am debating with the wife about grille cloth.  Larry kinda opened the door to that discussion, by suggesting he had put burgundy cloth in an instrument he redid.  My wife loves hot-rodding grille cloth, so she has put her powers of persuasion to work.  We have come down to burgundy, deep brown or black for grille cloth.  Something like burlap or guitar amp looking material.  These pictures show the progression from just torn apart, thru using refinisher to remove the old finish, to staining.  I got the color pretty close if you look at the feet and upper cabinet on the last picture.
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electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #34 on: June 27, 2016, 09:38:20 PM »
More pictures of refinishing.

American Walnut, exactly what Magnavox called the stain color.  The only place I could find American Walnut, which turned out to be a nearly exact match, was at Walmart!  The last two pictures show the start of the final finish.  I am using shellac as a base and polyurethane as the finish material.  The humidity we are experiencing around here make it difficult to get the proper gloss with shellac as a final finish.  I decided that gloss polyurethane would allow me to control the gloss without being affected to as great an extent by humidity.  So far, this has proven to be a good choice.  It's coming along nicely.  Yeah, I've heard all the scare stories about polyurethane propagated by the old radio guys.  I won't go into that.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #35 on: June 27, 2016, 09:49:06 PM »
I have been tinkering with the electronics while I wait for stuff to dry.  This little stereo is different from the bi-amp ones in that I can hook up everything and test it together on the bench.  The Collaro changer in this instrument is the most agreeable one I own.  It makes lots of noise, but it changes records perfectly.  It needs a drive tire, motor mounts, motor service and the usual tune-up, but it works nicely.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #36 on: June 27, 2016, 09:57:48 PM »
The biggest improvement so far has been the sliding lids.  Black grain filler has nearly completely obliterated the big black water mark.  Not perfect still, but eons better than when I started.

The third picture shows how shiny the top is becoming.  I have only semi-filled the grain on the top rail.  My wife likes it like that, and it looks good.  I am going to oil sand the final finish to probably 1500 grit.  Not glossy, but just off full gloss.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2016, 10:18:49 PM »
Rust-Oleum has a line of refinishing products out.  I really like their stains.  Their customer service is one step up from CenturyLink, which simply sucks.  Shellac has new (to me, the rookie, at least) designations of which I was unaware.  The old white shellac is now called "clear."  Orange shellac is now "amber" and de-waxed shellac is now "sanding sealer."  Shellac that is not dewaxed is called shellac.  It gets confusing.  Dewaxed shellac can be used with polyurethane, but not lacquer.  Waxed shellac can be used as a top coat, or as an undercoat as long as you use a coat of dewaxed under the final finish.  Shellac flakes to make your own are unavailable anywhere close to here.  I may be making a fool of myself at times, but I am leaning things that aren't taught anywhere.  I have to learn this by trial and error.  Every situation is different, every job is different.  Learning several ways of doing this will stand me in good stead in the future.  If you ask ten guys how they do it, you'll get eleven different answers. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #38 on: June 30, 2016, 12:48:18 PM »
I bought a 7003-00 multiplex adapter from an ARF member.  I connected it to the amp and tuner in this instrument and got basically nothing.  I could barely hear anything with the gain controls turned all the way up.  There was lots of static, though.  I had never really attempted to troubleshoot an MPX adapter before.  There is not a lot to one, and even less that is common to both channels. 

I printed out schematic for the amp, tuner, and MPX adapter, all available in "Downloads" at the top of this page.  The codes on this adapter were Run 3 on the 43rd week of 1962.  The 12AT7 input amp and cathode follower is coded week 43 of 1962, GE sourced.  The 6EA8 19hz amp and output is coded week 43 of 1962, RCA sourced.  Both are Magnavox branded.  Both tested good and are still in the chassis.  I checked element voltages and found them right on the money.  I fired up my trusty signal tracer and found signal at the input, at pin 1, the plate of the input amp section, and on the plate of the cathode follower section, pin 3.  I still had signal at pin 7, but nothing beyond that.  I found a 4uf@50 volt electrolytic coupling cap that was open.  I paralleled a pair of 2.2uf@50 volts to replace that and returned my MPX adapter to successful operation.  I replaced another 2Uf@50 volt electrolytic and a couple other coupling caps while I was in there.  I replaced a couple resistors that had drifted high.  I need to order a 30uf @450 volt cap so I can re-stuff the can, since there is no room to put it under the chassis. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

Larry H

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #39 on: June 30, 2016, 01:06:34 PM »
Your cabinet is really looking good.  You'll be at the finish line sooner than you think now.
--Larry

TC Chris

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2016, 08:56:14 PM »
I always like hearing of others' finishing choices.  I was laughing to myself about the shellac.  When I was in high school I built a big bass-reflex speaker enclosure to hold the speaker from a Zenith 10-S-155 console radio, for which I had the innards only. In grade school shop class (!), Mr. Sonnevil taught us to use shellac over stain before varnishing, as a sealer.  So when I built the speaker enclosure out of plywood, I stained it with what I found at the neighborhood hardware store, then shellacked, then varnished.  And the varnish would separate from the shellac at the least provocation--a bit of pressure, as from writing on the surface.  I figured it was the shellac's fault.

One day I looked at the can--it was a stain-varnish, a quickie refinishing combo, not real stain.  In essence,  had put shellac over varnish, and then varnish over the shellac.  Not a good plan.  Live and learn.  Still alive, still learning, but making fewer dumb mistakes.

Mr. Sonnevil died just  a few years ago in his 90s.  Before he did, I gathered all the shop projects I could find, mechanical drawings, woodworking projects and sheet-metal ones, and took a photo.  I sent him a letter and told him how fondly I and my brother remembered him and his classes. We all laugh about how we'll stop and think, "Mr. Sonnevil said to do it this way."  Kids today miss a lot.

Chris Campbell


electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2016, 10:46:25 PM »
Yeah, Chris, I'm surprised I'm using shellac myself.  I always thought shellac was something cheap that was used on hoe handles and stuff like that.  Not on good furniture.  When I started getting interested in correct furniture refinishing, I asked old-timers only how they did it.  People with established reputations.  Then I started asking younger people, mostly under 50 how they did it.  The main ingredient that I kept hearing was shellac.  Some used it for a sealer, some as a CYA, some as a finish, but all recommended its attributes which are it will stick to anything and anything will stick to it.  It is reduced by alcohol whereas most other finishes are reduced by petroleum based chemicals.  Whether you use petroleum (oil) based products or water-borne, shellac will not lift or separate.  There are some compatibility issues between waxed shellac and some lacquers and urethanes, but this is not universal and varies from product to product.  In my infancy in this business, I always use a test board to check for compatibility before applying a product or procedure to my project.  So, far, I've been more than satisfied with the final product.  I have only had to do one thing over.  If I don't tell you what it is, you'll never see it.

And Larry, you encouraged me to get after this project and have been a staunch supporter the entire way.  I appreciate that and I thank you.  In honor of your insistence on clean grille cloth, and as a way of honoring your suggestion of hot-rodded grille cloth, we will use black grille cloth, most likely, per your suggestion.  My wife is in charge of grille cloth, so this may change.  I understand that is the plan right at this time.  The original cloth is too "guitar" for my wife.  Black cloth should set off the black grain filler nicely.

The sliding lids are getting a piano-finish, foot deep, full gloss ( and rubbed shinier than that!).  It is designed to mimic the glass tops on the bigger Magnavoxes.  The photofinish lids are shiny, so I'm making these shiny.  I'm beginning to wonder if these lids were not originally photofinish.  I have only seen one set of veneered lids, and those are currently for sale on ebay.  These are the only ones I have seen in person.  They will look okay, but I'm not sure they are strictly correct.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #42 on: June 30, 2016, 11:21:46 PM »
What kind of glue did they use to hold the "Ten Year Diamond Needle" sticker on?  It is stringy and snotty when you lift one corner of the sticker.  If I can't figure out what kind of glue that is, I'm gonna gingerly remove the sticker, wash off the old glue (if possible) with lacquer thinner, then stick it on again with Elmer's Construction glue.  I want to repaint the interior of the cabinet, and that sticker will have to come off.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

Consoleman

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #43 on: July 02, 2016, 06:43:29 AM »
What kind of glue did they use to hold the "Ten Year Diamond Needle" sticker on?  It is stringy and snotty when you lift one corner of the sticker.  If I can't figure out what kind of glue that is, I'm gonna gingerly remove the sticker, wash off the old glue (if possible) with lacquer thinner, then stick it on again with Elmer's Construction glue.  I want to repaint the interior of the cabinet, and that sticker will have to come off.

You're on the right track with the Elmers. I used tite-bond wood glue on mine, put some wax paper over it then taped it down.

Nice job on that tear-down and refinish and good photos too!
Mark

electra225

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Re: Magnavox 1ST616 Restoration
« Reply #44 on: July 02, 2016, 08:21:01 AM »
I have some Tite-Bond.  I figured to use glue, wax paper, a flat board, and clamp it overnight so it will dry flat.  Yours worked okay, didn't it?  Thanks for the kind comments, Mark.

If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....