Author Topic: Idler restore experiment?  (Read 1745 times)

Motorola Minion

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2016, 03:57:56 PM »
That is a good idea. Mat Electronics has .25" wide flat and .125" square belts that may work. 10 for $2 or something close.

I have a customer's Zenith 2 g whose idler is extra-crispy but it has one of the dreaded 2-tire wheels, Double challenge.
The one pictured below is on a Philco-branded V-M and I did spring for a rebuild for that one. 
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Dave

hermitcrab

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2016, 08:35:59 PM »
My Silvertone cresant made changer has the double idler like yours in the picture... never attempted one of those ,I cheated and got one from Gary... lol
Elton

Motorola Minion

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2016, 08:58:05 AM »
I've got a rather cheap Sears-Crescent portable SS stereo that has a noisy-slipping wheel. The SS amp is also flaky but yet I rushed ahead and bought a new cartridge from Gary. :-[ So now I have to move forward.
 
Getting a rebuilt wheel would tie up $40 more in this unit plus an amp repair, possibly transistors. It might be a good one to try this on, the right thickness (.125") and circumference (2.3" and 5.4") belts are available.
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Dave

Consoleman

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2016, 11:17:50 AM »
I have two 3-speed Websters. That adds up to $100+ for idler and turret wheels for each one. Sometimes I wonder why I do it.
Mark

Phototone

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2016, 10:36:22 PM »
There is a product called "Re-Grip" that is designed for this, but I have been told it is really the same chemical as brake fluid for cars.  DOT 3 fluid.  I can't verify as I still have plenty of Re-Grip.  The  size of the idler will not affect turntable speed.  Taking some rubber off won't change speed.  It is the shaft size on the motor and the inside diameter of the rim drive surface on the turntable that determine speed. 

19and41

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2016, 02:26:13 PM »
I have used a product called Super Lube for about 30 years.  It is a synthetic grease that is used for the lubrication of 'O' ring seals and waterproofing outdoor RF connectors in addition to being an excellent lubricant.  I have found when it is applied to dried out rubber items, if they are rubber, they absorb the grease and it restores the softness and grip. I have used it on glazed and noisy fan belts,  weatherstripping, rubber insulated power cords and numerous other items.  I apply it with a tooth brush to a 1/8" thick coat on the item.  it will usually absorb it in a few hours and I repeat it a few times.  It doesn't deteriorate the rubber, either.

http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=Super+Lube

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Motorola Minion

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2016, 09:57:28 AM »
I have a Garrard "Custom deluxe" from a Sylvania console that looks much like a BSR yet it was not horribly gummed and seized(more like glued) up like the typical BSR. 

After a cleaning and phono-lube then a rubber-renu (wintergreen) treatment of the idler wheel, it behaves as if the wheel is slipping during the change cycle. The motor bearings were cleaned and oiled as usual, so its not that. It does not help the changer gear (the one under the platter like a BSR) seized to its shaft but still spins freely where the shaft attaches to the pan. Not a good situation but there is no noticeable resistance.

I think Ill try the super lube. 
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Dave

19and41

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Re: Idler restore experiment?
« Reply #22 on: February 08, 2017, 06:37:04 PM »
I have used the super lube on the idler tires in my Webster model 80 wire recorder. The unit steadily got worse and worse in drive slippage.  When that happens it breaks wire.  It softened and provided a better grip as the tires were glazing.  I'm sure it would work on the turntable tires.  I intend on using it on the W-C turntable I'm getting for my Magnavox.  Be sure to put on at least 3 coats and let it sink in.  It will.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke