Author Topic: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane  (Read 1277 times)

hbuchtel

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Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« on: August 22, 2016, 08:50:07 PM »
Hi all, I'd appreciate any help identifying the basic components that we are looking at here.

This is a new console to me, and I'm basically starting from scratch when it comes to understanding how tube amplifiers work.

Thanks!

HiFiFun

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2016, 06:28:12 PM »
Hello,
Can you supply the model # of the console ?
With the model #, we can locate the circuit schematic and
see what exactly these components are.
Also, can you take a bird's eye photo of the components
to see them mounted in the cabinet ?
 
In the meantime, here's my guesses until we see the schematic:
1. Image one may be a tube preamplifier
2. Image two is possibly an AC power transformer with a
rectifier tube.
3. Image three appears to be the main chassis with radio circuit and
possibly audio amplifier circuit.
Best,
HFF


HiFiFun

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2016, 07:29:50 PM »
Edit:
Image one looks like a C-M stereo multiplex adapter.
There are several types.
http://www.curtis-mathes.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=108961532

Here's the C-M history website by Glenn Waters page on Royal Danes:
http://www.curtis-mathes.com/curtismathesroyaldane.htm

HFF

AlexanderMartin

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2016, 08:41:47 PM »
To me, tube amplifiers are quite simple. Here's a couple videos by Uncle Doug to start you off:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5SSKX74DKg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=901iaPVVzY0

the TUNERS however are what gets a bit crazy.

hbuchtel

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2016, 10:49:43 AM »
Thank you both!

I will do some reading to get myself up to speed. Thanks for the links!

Attached is a photo of the label and a few close ups (from right to left) of the main chassis. No birds-eye view at the moment, sorry.

Here's a simple question for you guys: why do some tubes have a heat shield around them, and some don't?

electra225

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2016, 04:19:27 PM »
You have a ways to go before anything you hear on a YouTube video will help you.  My recommendation is to find an old RCA or NRI course somewhere and start from scratch.  Or an old radio repair book from the 1950's.  I like the ones by Middleton, but there are lots of good ones.  You should get your basics down, learn to identify parts, etc., before worrying about amplifier theory.  Good luck.

If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

hbuchtel

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2016, 07:07:04 PM »
Fair enough. I'm enjoying the first video, but I cannot disagree that I have a ways to go.  ;)

Can you recommend one of the books on tubebooks.org? They don't have the Middleton radio repair book you mentioned, but there are dozens more that might do the trick:

http://www.tubebooks.org/technical_books_online.htm

or

http://www.tubebooks.org/technical_books_online.htm#Audio (hi-fi, amplifiers, speakers...)

Henry

electra225

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2016, 08:49:00 PM »
There was a good text on ARF on radio repair.  I'll see if I can find it and send you a link.  Another suggestion is to go onto ebay and search for an antique radio repair book/manual.  Anything is better than you have now.  Howard Sams Co in Indianapolis published service literature and also published books on radio repair.  You might find one of those on ebay. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #8 on: August 24, 2016, 08:53:36 PM »
Try this:

http://www.antiqueradios.com/books.shtml

Hopefully you will find something that will help you.  Good luck.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

electra225

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If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

hbuchtel

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #10 on: August 26, 2016, 10:22:06 AM »
Thanks, I bought the DVD full of old manuals and it should arrive in a few days.

electra225

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2016, 07:54:45 PM »
There should be plenty of good information in there.  I'd thought about getting that DVD myself.  Good luck.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

AlexanderMartin

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Re: Help identify parts? Curtis Mathes Royal Dane
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2016, 01:04:38 AM »
Uncle Doug explains things quite literally, and I'd be surprised if anyone with a vague knowledge of anything electrical wouldn't understand it. Granted, I don't expect anyone to have a comprehensive knowledge of a tube amplifier just from watching that, but it'll give you a rough idea of what you're dealing with. If those videos are too intimidating, start on an all american five and work your way up (I did the same thing, trust me). And please keep in mind, RADIO repair and troubleshooting is quite different from AMPLIFIER repair and troubleshooting. Even guitar amp work is different from hifi amp work. This is mainly different in circuit to circuit troubleshooting, as RF devices operate on fundamentally different principles then audio amplifiers. And if you're gonna do a proper restoration of that, you're gonna need a soldering iron, solder, solid core wires (usually for filter cap wiring if you don't restuff,) a source for parts (mouser has literally everything and more,) a dedicated space, and a good amount of test equipment.