Author Topic: New from Statesville NC  (Read 983 times)

Chelms221

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New from Statesville NC
« on: January 31, 2017, 01:23:21 AM »
Hey everyone I'm Charles from Statesville NC and I just got a Philco stereophonic high fedelity console record player model k-1638-121 I haven't been able to find much on it at all. I work for a non profit organization and a lady was going to donate it but the organization doesn't take items as such and I told the lady I would personally come pick it up when I got off work. Taking a complete bargain wether it worked or not and got it home cleaned it up and it worked beautifully sounds amazing and clear a little static on a few albums when starting a song but clears up after a second or 2. I've always loved the look on vintage Sound these consoles. I am looking for anything nirvana first press original release. Anything Johnny Cash,Fleetwood Mac, I have around 100 albums so far in a 3days of having my console.

Larry H

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2017, 01:25:43 AM »
Welcome.  Post a picture or two of your Philco.
--Larry

Chelms221

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2017, 01:27:01 AM »
Here it is

Larry H

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2017, 01:31:41 AM »
HiFi Fun wrote in another thread you posted:

Welcome Chelms221,
Can you post some photos ?

I found a Sams Photofact service folder for Philco with chassis # 1638.
Reference Sams 589-3B from 1962.
 
This Sams indicates it has pc board mounted FM/AM radio circuits.
FM AFC transistor x 1.
Amplifier is point to point hand wiring.
This is a three channel stereo. L/R and center bass channels, with
three output transformers. Power transformer.
Audio 12AX7, power 1- 6BQ5 each channel, rectifier 6C4
No info given on the record changer in the unit.

HFF

Moderator's Note:  I am deleting the thread in chat as there are no need for two threads on this Philco.
--Larry

Chelms221

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2017, 01:35:57 AM »
Do you know anything as its value and also where I could get a needle. So I have a spare when time to replace

Larry H

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2017, 01:42:32 AM »
Do you know anything as its value and also where I could get a needle. So I have a spare when time to replace
Most run of the mill consoles like this one will generally go for $75 or so, depending on condition.  One of these fully restored, electronics and cabinet, would lilkely bring $200 or more. 
--Larry

Chelms221

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2017, 01:51:09 AM »
If I was to restore were do I get the parts and what would you recommend and also we get people looking to donate these consoles quite often I know a few weeks ago someone was wanting to donate a Magnavox one not sure what kind but I wasn't on the pick up and the lady just took it to the dump what are the most sought after consoles so I know to look out for them.

Larry H

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2017, 12:30:26 PM »
Have you ever restored a tube record player or radio?  If you haven't, a console is not the place to start.  Would suggest you restore a small record player first to learn how to solder, and the mfd. values of all the capacitors.  Start out small and work your way up to large consoles.
--Larry

TC Chris

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2017, 06:38:45 PM »
Welcome to the group.  I'm a native of NC but moved to MI at the age of about 4--they did not understand my southern accent, and gradually squeezed it out of me.

Restoration has three aspects--aesthetics (cabinet finish, grill cloth, general cleanliness), mechanics (cleaning & greasing yhe record changer as necessary), and electronics (replacing components like capacitors and resistors that are likely to fail, or troubleshooting).   Places like the Antique Radio Forum have lots pf guidance on that. We kick those things around on this list too, but we lack a central collection of links to the web sites that summarize those subjects.

Generally, the one big thing to stat with is to replace filter capacitors, devices that are likely to fail with age, and with dire consequences.

Chris Campbell

Chelms221

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2017, 10:17:56 PM »
I know how to solder and i havnt rebuilt any sorts of record players but i build computers and motherboards for computers ive made over 60+ computers. I just look to crossreference the part #s and replace part by part. Also my console started making a high pick screetch coming from the back inside what could that be

Larry H

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2017, 12:53:17 AM »
If you can solder, you can rebuild your amplifier and tuner.

There is lots of great information here about what you'll have to replace.

https://antiqueradio.org/recap.htm#check
--Larry

HiFiFun

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2017, 10:10:30 AM »
Quote
Also my console started making a high pick screetch coming from the back inside what could that be

Charles, the screech may be due to a bad capacitor.
That being said, here's my advice.
I strongly recommend that you do a complete capacitor re-cap
in this fine old stereo.
At this age of 55 years, the original capacitors are dried out, and electronically
compromised.
If you don't do this preventive maintenance, you can lose your power transformer,
and then it really gets expensive for parts replacement.

In addition, check all resistors for being within value and for opened up.
The vacuum tubes should be tested, also.

Be sure to go to the link (https://antiqueradio.org/recap.htm#check)
Larry posted earlier.
Since you have worked with pc boards, you have an experience edge,
if you need to work on your radio circuit pc board in the Philco.

Best,
HFF



Motorola Minion

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2017, 11:11:54 AM »
I had one of these exact models and I originally paid $50 and it was working fair. $200 is reasonable price once its made reliable. See thread here http://vintagehifi.net/index.php/topic,1590.0.html


Mine needed no tubes, all the original Philco tubes were fine. The first thing I did was replace a small number of capacitors as this is a simpler model. It has a very "warm" sound that probably sold it.
Tubes - Magical - Tubes

Dave

TC Chris

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2017, 10:02:45 PM »
I agree with the "replace capacitors" and "check resistors" advice.  Checking tubes, eh, not so sure, unless something's just plain ol' dead.  Tubes are funny--they can test "weak" and perform just fine (or in some cases, test fine and not function).  The most likely tube failure is corrosion on the pins or the socket terminals.  That's an easy fix--some Deoxit applied (or even just wiggling the tube in its socket).  I've got  a tube tester and I use it mostly to check for shorts and dead filaments.

The bare minimum is replacing filter capacitors because they can kill the power transformer quickly, and then the coupling capacitors on the power output tubes, because they can cause lots of mischief.  My usual example is the very cool Sansui 1000A tube receiver I found at curbside.  All new tubes installed, but one of the (expensive) 7591 output tubes was burned up.  This receiver was known for failure of the original oil-type capacitors, and one of the coupling caps on that channel's outputs had failed and the brand-new tube burned up.  The owners probably figured "gee, something very expensive is wrong" after their new tube burned up, and they set it on the curb for me to find.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: New from Statesville NC
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2017, 11:34:11 AM »
The changer looks like a VM to me.  That being the case, parts and repair information should be readily available.  VM changers are well-built and reliable.  Good luck.
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....