Author Topic: Sympathy?  (Read 414 times)

TC Chris

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Sympathy?
« on: April 06, 2017, 07:44:06 PM »
OK, I have the sense that there are a few other old farts in this group, so maybe I can get some sympathy.  I just finished applying online for my Social Security benefits.  I turn 70 in June, so delaying won't get me any more money but it will cost me if I miss some months.  It's like making a doctor's appointment--easy to put off ( and out of mind).  Hitting "send" on that application made me feel really elderly.  Maybe I should buy a cane or hearing aids?  My commute to work today was by bicycle, as it is almost every day, so maybe there's hope still.  It's always shocking to look in the mirror in the morning because the face that looks back at me doesn't match the age I feel.  There was one of those online sayings the other day-"I knew I'd get old. I just didn't realize it would happen so quickly."  Social Security!!??  It's for old people!!

Chris Campbell

Harbourmaster

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2017, 08:01:34 PM »
Any day above ground is a good one!
-- Aloha, Ken

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electra225

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2017, 09:45:59 PM »
Social Security did not make me feel old.  RETIRING made me feel old, useless and unimportant.  My hobbies interested me for about two months after I retired, then I started getting on my wife's nerves.  I figured my hobbies were more fun when I made time for them.  If they were all I had to do, that did not make them hobbies anymore to me.  I was accustomed to being in charge, responsible for other people and what I thought about something mattered.  When I retired, nobody needed me anymore.  My customers were not my customers anymore, my guys worked for somebody else.  My friends still in business had different interests all of a sudden.  I took a part time job.  It pays all of $12 an hour.  I dearly love it.  I have a little responsibility, I work with kids who keep me thinking about new stuff and not feeling sorry for myself.  I have "adopted" three of the younger men I work with.  My wife calls them her "rented grandkids."  I overheard one of them tell a new employee the other day "see that old dude over there?  If you try to keep up with him, he'll work you to death!"  That was one of the nicest things anybody has said about me in a long time.  The secret is not necessarily BEING old, it is working hard not to actually FEEL old.  I stay active and TRY not to let little things get on my nerves.   ;)
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TC Chris

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2017, 11:45:17 PM »
Social Security did not make me feel old.  RETIRING made me feel old, useless and unimportant.  My hobbies interested me for about two months after I retired, then I started getting on my wife's nerves.  I figured my hobbies were more fun when I made time for them.  If they were all I had to do, that did not make them hobbies anymore to me.  I was accustomed to being in charge, responsible for other people and what I thought about something mattered.  When I retired, nobody needed me anymore.  My customers were not my customers anymore, my guys worked for somebody else.  My friends still in business had different interests all of a sudden.  I took a part time job.  It pays all of $12 an hour.  I dearly love it.  I have a little responsibility, I work with kids who keep me thinking about new stuff and not feeling sorry for myself.  I have "adopted" three of the younger men I work with.  My wife calls them her "rented grandkids."  I overheard one of them tell a new employee the other day "see that old dude over there?  If you try to keep up with him, he'll work you to death!"  That was one of the nicest things anybody has said about me in a long time.  The secret is not necessarily BEING old, it is working hard not to actually FEEL old.  I stay active and TRY not to let little things get on my nerves.   ;)

This is exactly why I have not retired.  I'm finally good enough at what I do that I don't sweat the basic stuff, but there's always a challenge of new things or big messes to keep the brain working.  It seems a shame to spend all those years learning how to do it, and then retire just when I finally know something. On weekends I can snooze for way too long, but during the week getting to work on time (almost) makes me get up and get going.  Time is used more economically when there's less of it available.

We've got young people at work too and we can share stories from different generations. 

And oh yeah... having that paycheck coming in still will give me the funds for projects, like the '38 Buick or the huge pile of old radios (or getting the Chevy to start).

Chris Campbell

Larry H

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2017, 11:50:26 PM »
I retired 10 years ago at age 62.  Nobody wants to hire a retail manager, even though I had great references and had run stores for a number of large companies, who is nearing retirement age.  I found it extremely difficult to find a job when I reached age 60.  Before that, it was always easy.  But a local company hired me at age 60 and I worked for them for two years until I could get on Social Security.

I love being retired.  I go to bed when I want to, get up when I want to, shave when I want to, etc. etc.  No wife anymore to rule my life.  I'm done forever with that stuff.

You will love it if you stay busy.  I stay busy all the time restoring record players for myself, and my customers.  I get a little stir crazy when there is a week I don't have anything to do except for house work and laundry.
--Larry

electra225

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2017, 12:00:23 AM »
I'm teaching one of those kids to fry turkeys and how to play "vinyl."  One kid, I donated a Hank Thompson song for his wedding, "something old." I introduced him to his girlfriend and she hated him.  He grew on her.  The third one is a knothead with boundless energy who was about to get his butt canned because he could not keep his mouth shut.  I have encouraged him to use his energy for good, and to use his considerable ambition to take himself in a positive, forward direction.  I make sure I leave him about two hours' more work of an evening than he can possibly get done.  It is amazing how much he can get done, accurately and effeciently.  I encourage him, give him a "little scratch behind the ears" and make sure he does not get discouraged.  This young man will make a fantastic manager after he learns to trust his instincts a little more.  These young men, 24, 22 and 21 years old, keep my young.  They look up to me.  I have to be careful around them so that I do not do or say anything that would set a bad example for them.  I tell them my silly old stories.  These fine young men only need somebody to pay attention to them.  None of them have grandfathers in their lives and I guess I fit the bill.  I am truly honored.


My BIL loves retirement.  It is just not for me.  My grandfather never really retired.  My dad never retired.  I'm happy for someone who is successfully retired.  Good for you, Larry.  Retiring is one of the biggest mistakes I ever made.  Cancer was the impetus, but I should have gone back to work after I got done with cancer treatment.  I could not have operated my car restoration shop, but I could have done something not so physically demanding.  My wife drives me crazy sometimes, but I could not imagine life without her.  I have pulled enough silly crap since we have been married that would have gotten my butt tossed to the curb by anybody else.  She has always claimed she was "desperate" to not trade me in for a better model.  She likes to remind me of the time I stuck her in my Mack and sent her to Texas to get a tractor I had bought.  She had never driven that Mack or any truck that size in her life.  She made it just fine and made a really good part-time hand when I had a truck without a driver.  She never quite forgave me for that, though.   ;)
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

TC Chris

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2017, 12:16:05 AM »
I'm teaching one of those kids to fry turkeys and how to play "vinyl."  One kid, I donated a Hank Thompson song for his wedding, "something old." I introduced him to his girlfriend and she hated him.  He grew on her.  The third one is a knothead with boundless energy who was about to get his butt canned because he could not keep his mouth shut.  I have encouraged him to use his energy for good, and to use his considerable ambition to take himself in a positive, forward direction.  I make sure I leave him about two hours' more work of an evening than he can possibly get done.  It is amazing how much he can get done, accurately and effeciently.  I encourage him, give him a "little scratch behind the ears" and make sure he does not get discouraged.  This young man will make a fantastic manager after he learns to trust his instincts a little more.  These young men, 24, 22 and 21 years old, keep my young.  They look up to me.  I have to be careful around them so that I do not do or say anything that would set a bad example for them.  I tell them my silly old stories.  These fine young men only need somebody to pay attention to them.  None of them have grandfathers in their lives and I guess I fit the bill.  I am truly honored.


My BIL loves retirement.  It is just not for me.  My grandfather never really retired.  My dad never retired.  I'm happy for someone who is successfully retired.  Good for you, Larry.  Retiring is one of the biggest mistakes I ever made.  Cancer was the impetus, but I should have gone back to work after I got done with cancer treatment.  I could not have operated my car restoration shop, but I could have done something not so physically demanding.

As an old guy I have come to appreciate kindness and good behavior  in ways that I did not when younger.   Good for you in guiding those young people.  They will remember you often and fondly for many years.  One time I was trying to do some yard work and the little girl from next door kept asking questions.  I was getting a bit annoyed but then I remembered being a kid.  On one side, we had a grumpy neighbor, a guy who was always picking fights and being a jerk.  Two doors in the other direction were the older couple, Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, people who tolerated us kids, made us feel welcome in their yard and home, and taught us some lessons.   While that neighbor girl was bothering me, I thought to myself, "what kind of person do I want this kid to remember me as?  As the grumpy jerk, or as the generous Phillipses?"  That was easy to answer so I relaxed about the yard work and chatted with the little girl.

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2017, 03:20:00 PM »
I turned 60 last September.  There are still areas that I feel not quite old in and on the other hand there are folks in my high school class that have slipped the mortal coil. I sometimes worry about what's in store but try to look out the windows at the scenery on the ride.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

Bill

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2017, 07:24:59 PM »
After reading all of your comments, I can relate to just about every one during some point in my life.  And Chris, 70 is only a number it has nothing to do with how you feel.  The only thing that I can add is since I have retired I have been busier than I was working 60-70 hours a week.  The only problem.....I'm not getting paid.  :'(  I need to work on that I guess.  There is always something to do.  Family or friends are always needing help.  Like today for example, my 87 year old aunt and my 89 year old uncle, who is legally blind, called and asked if I could fix a faucet for them.  Of course I can and about an hour later it was done and I did get paid.  Not with money but with a loaf of her homemade bread right from the oven. Much better than money.  ;D

Who knows what tomorrow will bring.

Bill

electra225

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2017, 07:47:54 PM »
I have learned to be grateful for the aches and pains of advancing age.  This means the part that hurts still works!   ;)
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

TC Chris

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2017, 08:42:20 PM »
My goal is to be a high-functioning old person, and so far, so good.  I'd love to be able to do a back flip, but that's probably not an age-appropriate activity for me.  Beyond that, let's not worry about boundaries too much.  That's why I'm commuting to work on the bicycle most days--it make me feel so much better before and after work.  So with that notion in mind, here's a link to a New York Times article about the guy who co-invented the lithium-ion battery, that crucial energy source for us, in 1980.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/07/opinion/sunday/to-be-a-genius-think-like-a-94-year-old.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=opinion-c-col-right-region&region=opinion-c-col-right-region&WT.nav=opinion-c-col-right-region&_r=0

But he's 94 now, and he regards that battery as completely unsatisfactory, so he's working on a solid-state battery that doesn't burn and explode.  The point of the article is that a lot of age myths--like young people have all the new ideas--are just myths.  When he came back from WW II and wanted to study physics at age 23, he was told he was to old(!!).  Apparently at 94 he has forgotten that rule.

Chris Campbell

MEZLAW

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2017, 09:06:55 PM »
Sorry for coming to the party late, but I've been busy in retirement!  ;)

I took SS at age 62! For me it was about the math.  When I added up all the money I would receive between 62 and 66, then devided it by the difference in rates, I wouldn't break even until 92 years of age!  I hope I live that long!  I own my own business and have cut it way back, maybe this will be the last year, I'll be 67 in a couple of weeks and still have very good health. 

Harbourmaster

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2017, 03:38:36 PM »
My dad, now 83 constantly complains that he never worked so much in his life as he has since retiring.
-- Aloha, Ken

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danrclem

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Re: Sympathy?
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2017, 06:13:26 PM »
I was 62 last November and officially retired last Thursday.  The place that I worked at was bought by a Canadian company in 2007 and they aren't very nice people.  That's putting it mildly.  That and my health isn't 100% made me decide to leave early.

I figure between my hobbies and the work that needs to be done here around the house should keep me busier that I'll want to be.  If I ever get everything straightened out I may try a part time job or even mow a few yards.