Author Topic: Big Yard Work  (Read 173 times)

19and41

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
    • View Profile
Big Yard Work
« on: April 11, 2017, 03:34:03 PM »
I thought I would take an extra day off and work on the drainage easement that borders my property.  The guy down stream complains about being flooded out and this would fix it.  I had to hack, nip and saw a few thousand noxious weeds out of there til I got a clear view at a 2 foot rise in the ditch about 50 feet down from my property line.  that diverts the water into the boobs' yard.  I hear hin swearing at the top of his lungs while constantly trying to saw wet wood with his circular saw.  He gets it running, plunges it and it nearly siezes after 2-3 seconds.  At other times, he is mowing his lawn and it is always a few blades of grass short of a total bog for the entire time he does it.  I am about done with this years' clearing job, except for touching the debris off next weekend.  That ought to be great fun.  I burnt a hole in my hair burning this weekend.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

electra225

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1489
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2017, 07:16:22 PM »
Sometimes doing the right thing is just the right thing.   :)

I spent this whole day burning leaves on the neighbor's back lot and burning out his ditch so the leaves won't clog my culvert.  I believe my hair is still okay.   ;)
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

19and41

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2017, 08:34:06 PM »
I think if I managed to get this ditch lit, it would look like the second burning of Atlanta.  Boy, am I sore after doing the caber toss with all those trees over the 7 ft. fence.  all the scratches and rips itch real bad too.  I have the makin's of a bonfire on the burn pile.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2017, 09:52:24 PM »
I have this little summer cottage on the shore of Lake Huron's enormous Saginaw Bay.  Look at a map of Michigan--it's what lies between the main part of the lower peninsula mitten and the Thumb.  When a bug NE storm blows in, it's right down the Bay.  The water level rises and the waves can be huge.  Right now the Lake Huron water levels are above the long term average.  Last week we had a big northeaster.  Winds from the NOAA weather instruments offshore showed gusts to 63 mph and steady-state winds of 48 mph for a while.  Water levels on the SW shore where my cottage is rose 3-1/2 feet, and the wave crests were higher. 

The first photo shows the walkway leading to the seawall.  The red concrete pavers were the walkway.  The big rounded stones edged them.  The waves coming over the seawall tore everything up.  The big set of green steel steps, made to fit over the seawall, get pulled up off-season because big storms will wash them off the wall.  Well, this time the storm washed them off the wooden deck that you see.  They're heavy--takes two sturdy guys to lift them.  in the upper left you can see the  neighbor's old steel jetty in the upper left.  The other neighbor said that at the height of the storm, the top 6" were visible only in the troughs of the waves.

The second photo shows the steps from a different angle.  The third photo shows the side yard of the cottage.  Note the debris.  The log, the tan thing you see at the front of the debris field, is 7' long and 6" diameter.  It came over the seawall and washed back there.  The calm-weather water level is maybe 8-9 feet below the point where the log rests.

This little house was built in 1929.  In 1946, moving ice came ashore one spring and knocked it down.  The first owner, who built it,  propped the roof up and rebuilt the front three walls under it.  The back wall is still 2" out of plumb. So is the brick fireplace/chimney.

My task now is to get the walkway re-laid in time for summer tenants.  The little house pays its taxes via summer rentals.  No heat; drain the pipes in the winter.  A real summer cottage.

Chris Campbell

19and41

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 256
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2017, 10:17:06 PM »
My family had one on a much smaller lake near Sturgis.  That annual battle must be like trying to keep the ocean in check.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 717
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2017, 12:22:48 AM »
My parents bought this little place in 1954 and I bought it from them in about 1986.  That was the year of record high Great Lakes levels.  In the photos you'll see wire baskets called "gabions" that hold stones.  I assembled and filled each one by hand.  (Each and every rock got handled twice--once into the wheelbarrow, once again into the gabion).  They sit on top of the seawall, to add about 3' of height.  In '86, waves were washing against the front of the house in big storms before the gabions went in.  After '86 levels dropped dramatically and were below the long term average for quite a few years.  Now they're higher but we haven't had anything quite as dramatic as this last big storm in a long time.  Well, nothing except the ice.  About 5 years ago the ice moved in--piled about 20' high on my deck.  I did not engineer it for that much weight but it survived. The ice came within 10' of the cottage.

The reinforced concrete seawall was built in late 1946 after the spring ice movement that crushed all the houses.  It's the only original seawall still standing there.  The owner/builder of the cottage was a construction company foreman, and when he worked on his own property, he seems to have done it right.

Chris Campbell

MEZLAW

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 43
    • View Profile
Re: Big Yard Work
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2017, 09:09:55 PM »
The yard work has just started and I'm already suffering with poison ivy!   >:(