Author Topic: Hank Snow  (Read 164 times)

electra225

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Hank Snow
« on: April 26, 2017, 04:56:00 PM »
People either love Hank Snow or they can't stand his music.  Not much middle of the road, it seems.  I am one of the folks who likes Hank Snow.  His style is fairly common for the time, and he benefited greatly by the Nashville Sound.  His earlier material tended to be fairly "nasal" while his Nashville Sound recordings proved to be smoother and lower pitched.  Like many country artists of the early 1960's, his singing as a baritone was more pleasant than his earlier days of singing like a tenor.  His voice was fairly rangy, but his vocal stylings were unique. 

My dad could neither read nor write until his kids got in school and taught him.  But he had a beautiful singing voice.  He sounded exactly like Redd Stewart, the singer for the Pee Wee King band back in the late 1940's.  My dad was a square dance caller and conducted barn dances with yours truly handling the record playing chores.  Dad would go to the field on his Oliver tractors, equipped with straight exhaust pipes.  He could sing above the roar of the engine and the whine of the transmission.  He had quite the repertoire of songs, but "Galway Bay" was one of his favorites.  The recording he heard this song on was either Hank Snow, Carl Smith, Redd Stewart or Eddy Arnold.  I had looked for several years for the exact recording he liked.  "Galway Bay" was considered an Irish hymn by my grandmother.  Joe Feeney, on the Lawrence Welk show always sang the "official" version of "Galway Bay".  Some of the words were different than the "country" version that dad liked so well.

I was digging thru my "unknown, undiscovered" record stash the other day and ran across a Hank Snow album "I've Been Everywhere" on RCA Victor "Living Stereo" LSP-2675, circa 1963.  On this album was dad's favorite version of "Galway Bay."  I had always figured that dad added some of his own words, since the version he sang was so different from the Joe Feeney version that I had heard more frequently.  Dad sang the song word for word, note for note like Hank Snow. 

"I've Been Everywhere" is a song that was one of Hank's more famous, had been played and over-played for 50 years on every kind of radio genre imaginable, up to and including Dick Clark's "American Bandstand".  "When It's Sprintime in Alaska" is a song recorded and made famous by Johnny Horton.  "You're The Reason" is on a 78 that I have by Redd Stewart and Pee Wee King.  "It's A Little More Like Heaven" was more commonly associated with Carl Smith.  "On That Old Hawaiian Shore With You" was written and recorded my Clarence E. Snow (Hank himself).  "Galway Bay".  "Jamaica Fairwell" more commonly associated with Harry Belefonte, who recorded it first.  "Lili Marlene" recorded earlier by both Eddie Fisher and Al Martino, "In The Blue Canadian Rockies" written by Hank himself, "Geisha Girl" and "My Filipino Rose", and lastly "Melba From Melbourne" written and recorded in 1961 by Marty Robbins.  For a Hank Snow fan, there is not a bad note in this album.  There were lots of good albums recorded in 1963, and this is certainly one of them. 
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Bill

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Re: Hank Snow
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2017, 07:14:48 PM »
Thanks Greg, I never bother to know any history on artists.  Now I'm going to YouTube Hank Snow and take a listen.

Bill

TC Chris

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Re: Hank Snow
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2017, 09:26:42 PM »
My favorite Hank Snow tune is "A Fool Such as I."  There's a nice YouTube video of a TV performance.  A few years ago I captured it on my iPod Classic.  When it comes to country music, I favor the wistful and melancholy, although I've also got Ernest Tubb singing "Waltz Across Texas" on the Pod.  Long ago, Duke Ellington sad "If it sounds good, it is good."  I agree.  There are lots of classic tunes that can make me weep--like Patsy Cline singing just about anything.l

Now, either (a) I've forgotten the sequence I used to save the videos, or (b) YouTube changed their process so we can't save the videos any more.  If anybody knows how to save YouTube videos to iPod, please tell me how!!

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Hank Snow
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2017, 09:18:15 AM »
I'm afraid that I messed up the stuff I had saved on YouTube.  So now I play it on YouTube and transfer that to cassette tape.  Then I process the tape with my music conversion software and save it to my external hard drive and Windows Media Player.  I won't lose it again.

Another, later Hank Snow hit was "Easy To Love".  It was ten years later than the album I mentioned in this thread.
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electra225

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Re: Hank Snow
« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2017, 09:57:22 AM »
If I had to pick a favorite Hank Snow recording, this would be toward the top of the list.  "Ninety Miles An Hour (Down A Dead End Street)"  Early Nashville Sound, lots of Floyd Cramer piano.  Wonderful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35xNMD8ciU4&list=PLYltiLVUD7LnQNZr16Wle_hNX3R2ShzIM
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Countryford

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Re: Hank Snow
« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2017, 12:25:29 PM »
I've been a fan of Hank Snow for some time now. I've not heard a song from him that I didn't like. I like the song "I've Been Everywhere" but it seems when it gets played on the radio (Sirius Willie's Roadhouse) that they play the Johnny Cash version. While I like Cash, I think Snow did a much better job on that song.