Author Topic: Magnavox 54F, Goodwill SC  (Read 230 times)

19and41

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"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

Harbourmaster

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Re: Magnavox 54F, Goodwill SC
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2017, 02:37:35 PM »
Wow... Beat up, broken grill work, hacked wiring and the wrong record changer. 


About worth the opening bid IF you can pick it up.
-- Aloha, Ken

No Console Left Behind!

TC Chris

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Re: Magnavox 54F, Goodwill SC
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2017, 08:17:32 PM »
Wow... Beat up, broken grill work, hacked wiring and the wrong record changer. 


About worth the opening bid IF you can pick it up.

I'm always a sucker for orphan devices, and sometimes the salvage price sets a good floor.  This one has the two big field coil speakers, maybe an added phono preamp, and the casework isn't beyond redemption (OK, that fretwork would require some effort, but in the short term you could remove it all).  Getting it for $25 wouldn't be a really bad deal.

Chris Campbell

AstroSonic100

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Re: Magnavox 54F, Goodwill SC
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2017, 05:33:41 PM »
This set is a pre-war Magnavox and looks like it has the optional FM tuner. The chassis is CR-177 and the FM tuner is CR-169 or CR-170 which tunes the old FM band 41.7 - 50.4 mc. 


The record changer most likely was a three post Webster-Chicago.  These changers contained parts made out of pot metal and very few are left that are in operating condition which is possibly why the changer in this set was replaced with a newer one.
Ray

19and41

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Re: Magnavox 54F, Goodwill SC
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2017, 10:30:35 PM »
Too bad they didn't show the tuner faces.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke