Author Topic: Modern music and vintage consoles  (Read 259 times)

walyfd

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Modern music and vintage consoles
« on: July 23, 2017, 02:11:12 PM »
I never bought a lot of LPS back when I was "young"...  music was on the radio and chances were I'd get the cassette instead.

Yesterday, I found a MINT copy of "Synchronicity" by the Police.  I kinda feel it's sacrilege to play it on a 1961 console but had to try it.

WOW!  Unbelievable.  I'm really impressed by the quality of the record itself.  The console and Garrard 88 changer handle it perfectly.  So much definition.

Larry H

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2017, 06:54:06 PM »
That's a good album.  I've owned a copy for many years.  I'll tell you what else sounds terrific on vintage consoles.  Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and also Steve Miller Band.
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Motorola Minion

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2017, 01:20:21 PM »
The early 80's seemed to be a good time for records although I think there were some bad pressings and poor masters. Just before CD's came out, records were the standard for audiophiles and the mixing, equalization and such had to account for many different types of record players. Linear tracking seemed to be the best type of player.

My kids will plug their tablet into the 1960 Magnavox Symphony (without my prodding) switch it on and play some pretty punishing stuff on it. In fact, they prefer it to the PC's speakers or ear buds and that is quite a compliment. Everyone has lowered their standards in favor of variety and access, so the vintage HiFi's, both tube and early transistor, sound that much sweeter to them. I tell them its all about matching speakers to the amplifiers. Magnavox excelled at that.

Unfortunately my once-new copy of the Doors first album does not sound so great as Johnny Mathis or Andy Williams on the '63 Motorola. I'm thinking after 36 years, that Doors LP is just plain worn out.
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Dave

AstroSonic100

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2017, 04:42:53 PM »
Dave - I agree with you about poor pressings in the early 80s.  I brought many an LP back to the store because of pressing defects.  I had to return several copies of the same album before I got a good copy.  One of them asked what type of equipment I was playing these on.  I told them I had a Technics SL5200 (still have it) with a Shure V15 Type IV.  They said my equipment was too good for the records and I was just being too picky about sound quality.

The mid-50s had their problems too.  I have some 1957-1960 RCA LPs that have bubbles and dents in the vinyl and that even included their Red Seal line of records and expensive box sets.
Ray

Ken Doyle

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2017, 09:38:31 AM »

Unfortunately my once-new copy of the Doors first album does not sound so great as Johnny Mathis or Andy Williams on the '63 Motorola. I'm thinking after 36 years, that Doors LP is just plain worn out.


What color is the label?  The original pressings have a tan label.  The later pressings are from lousy multi-generation tapes and sound like crud.




Motorola Minion

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2017, 02:45:49 PM »
Its great to have record knowledge here Ken. The Doors LP is tan, Elecktra label. Though played on Dual 1009 and 1019 using Pickering V15-III carts, it is worn out.

I may drop by my local record shop and pick up a new copy. It will cost over $20 but its worth it. I am reluctant to play my other long-time favorite LP's as they too are worn from the "record party" tours, mostly from the previous owners.

My newest restored '63 Motorola has its original Sonotone cartridge on the tone arm. A fairly clean Rhino re-issue of Todd Rungren's Hermit of Mink Hollow sounded just fine on it.

I use the vibrasonic sparingly with anything later than 1967 8), as the effect seems unnatural on later recordings.   
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Dave

Pizmo

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2017, 05:31:36 PM »
I'm new too the whole console stereo and vinyl record scene

Is playing modern music on an old console considered taboo?

If so then I should probably keep to myself the music that I've been playing on the old RCA console that I recently acquired

TC Chris

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2017, 08:19:27 PM »
Geez, you can play whatever you want, as long as you've got a good stylus ("needle") and don;t try to play stereo discs with a mono cartridge.  Duke Ellington said "If is sounds good, it is good." If your console doesn't sound good, keep working.

Chris Campbell

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2017, 12:30:54 PM »
My 1960 Magnavox with 6V6 tubes seems to "eagerly" play what my kids plug in the "TAPE INPUT" with their I-pads as easily as it does our legacy vinyl with early stereo recordings. 
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Dave

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Re: Modern music and vintage consoles
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2017, 12:37:29 PM »
I'm new too the whole console stereo and vinyl record scene

Is playing modern music on an old console considered taboo?

If so then I should probably keep to myself the music that I've been playing on the old RCA console that I recently acquired

No, these workhorses know the full sonic range, and that is no problem for an RCA Victor - the Nipper produced a lot of vintage records, so they had the emphasis/de-emphasis networks well-matched. I really cant wait to  optimize/recap my '63 RCA console :D
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Dave