Author Topic: Up north in Michigan  (Read 2639 times)

Bill

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Up north in Michigan
« on: September 08, 2017, 08:28:41 PM »
So I'm just returning after 10 days in upper Michigan. Did my usual Labor Day Bridge Walk. (25th time) For those of you who don't know on Labor Day the Mackinaw Bridge (connects upper and lower Michigan) closes and people are allowed to walk across it. (didn't see you Chris)  The bridge is 5 miles in length but by the time you are done walking it's more like 6 to 7 miles.  Great time and I recommend it to everyone at least once.  Anyway one of the things I do during my time is check out the antique stores, yard sales, thrift stores, junk stores, etc.  Cheboygan Mi. has a store called the Crystal Gate.  I have been there off and on over the years.  One thing they never seem to lack is records.  I always look and usually find something.  This year while checking out I asked the owner just how many records he has.  He said a few years ago he had around 60,000 but his numbers are going down and he is not replenishing.  He still has plenty so if anyone is in Upper Michigan do check out this place.  Over the years I have also found vintage HIFI-Stereo stuff there.  He is usually reasonable priced.  He has a very nice Silvertone tube stereo for $45.00.  Nice cabinet and by the grille cloth has 12" woofers.  There were a couple of vintage floor radios and a vintage home theater.  I guess you never know when or where you will find something.


Bill

picard

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2017, 07:54:19 PM »
I always find the best stuff when I least expect it.

19and41

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2017, 05:41:57 PM »
Michigan is a treasure trove of such stores and shops and some of the nicest taverns and restaurants.  All of those I miss.  The cold, not so much.   :D
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

Bill

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2017, 06:16:53 AM »
So you were from Michigan?  Where if I might ask?  And what warm place do you call home now.  I agree about the cold part.  AZ here I come for part of the winter.  :)

Bill

19and41

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2017, 07:21:15 AM »
I moved from Kalamazoo down here to Jonesboro Georgia in 1996.  The day I drove down there was 14 inches of snow falling up there, and it was in the fifties when I arrived here the end of the same day.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2017, 08:54:49 PM »
OK, all you wimps, somebody has to speak up for the delights of real winters and changing seasons.  I've never quite understood leaving this part of the country when we get snow to frolic in.  I've even got a winter bicycle with studded tires & fenders to get me to work.  My mother, who was born & raised in Alabama, sticks around all winter, and she's in her 90s now.  Cold weather improves the character.  And it gives me a chance to stay indoors more and get some old-radio work done.

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2017, 07:01:21 AM »
Believe me, I've had enough winters up there to give me character to last a lifetime.  I just like these "miniature" winters down here better.  As far as the summers go there, the last summer I worked there calibrating and repairing scales, I did calibrations at the piston ring factory in Muskegeon, and it was 113 degrees outside and 141 degrees inside at the scales below the smelters, so I have been treated to both ends of the spectrum there.   ;D 
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

Bill

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2017, 07:05:28 AM »
I lived in Kalamazoo while attending Western.  Nice town.  I'm from Hart, left and went to Grand Rapids to work, retired and came back to Hart.  I guess I'm a small town kind of guy.  113 degrees in Muskegon....that must have been a record.  Hart is 30 minutes north of Muskegon.

Chris.......as far as Michigan in the winter, it's not the snow or cold it's the no SUN!!!!  I love the clean look of fresh snow and there is nothing like snow for Christmas and I stay in Michigan for Christmas.  But by the time the first of the year rolls around my poor old arthritic body needs some sun so off to AZ I go.  That way too I can explore and see what treasures I might find.  :D

Bill

19and41

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2017, 07:23:10 AM »
Every time I hear this I think of the winters up there.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2017, 06:55:36 PM »
I lived in Kalamazoo while attending Western.  Nice town.  I'm from Hart, left and went to Grand Rapids to work, retired and came back to Hart.  I guess I'm a small town kind of guy.  113 degrees in Muskegon....that must have been a record.  Hart is 30 minutes north of Muskegon.

Chris.......as far as Michigan in the winter, it's not the snow or cold it's the no SUN!!!!  I love the clean look of fresh snow and there is nothing like snow for Christmas and I stay in Michigan for Christmas.  But by the time the first of the year rolls around my poor old arthritic body needs some sun so off to AZ I go.  That way too I can explore and see what treasures I might find.  :D

Bill

Ah, no wonder... you've got it all backward.  November and December are the miserable months, gray and kinda cold.  It's too cold for warm weather activities and not cold enough for winter activities, plus it's cloudy and dark all the time and we are forced to endure that big commercial holiday that celebrates buying stuff, and more stuff.  The real delight of the winter comes just after New Year. That's when we get crisp cold mornings with bright blue skies.  The days are getting longer, ever so slightly. Jan. and Feb. are two of the best months to be here in this cool state.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2017, 08:35:16 PM »
Hey Chris,

I would agree 100% about November and December and you have answered a question I have always wondered......and that is what January and February are like in your area and north.  Cold and sunny.  In my neck of the woods January and February are only slightly better than November and December as far as the sunshine goes.  If we get 3 days of sunshine in each month we call it a blessing. And yes the days getting longer is one thing I look forward to.  As far as that commercial holiday I'm in agreement there too.

Bill

TC Chris

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2017, 08:58:28 PM »
The Great Lakes are our vast resource in these parts, enormous bodies of water that are like oceans in many ways except for the lesser density of fresh water, making for different wave forms.  People who have not seen or sailed on the lakes have no idea how big they are and how wild they can be.  Ted Turner was an ocean-racing sailor and he came to Lake Michigan for the Chicago-Mackinaw race, p the length of the lake.  A reporter asked him before the start if he was worried about possible bad weather.  He responded that he had sailed the oceans and wasn't intimidate din the least by these little lakes.  A huge storm came through during the race, dismasting several boats and making others drop out of the race.  Afterward, Ted said "I hereby withdraw any comments I may have made about inland sailing."

Most of you probably have heard Gordon Lightfoot's famous song, "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald."  The Fitz was 729 feet long--that's a big boat, folks--and yet Lake Superior sank her.

But while the Lakes are our wonderful resource, they also give those of us who live downwind a lot of cloudy skies in the fall and winter.  As the wind blows over, water evaporates and forms clouds.  It may then drop as snow when the air rises over land and cools, called "lake effect snow."  And the Lakes are big heat sinks, retaining warmth into the winter and delaying frost along the shorelines.  That's why we have fruit crops along the western side of Michigan.  Basically, the Great Lakes create their own weather.

Most of the midwest was settled by immigrants and eastern dwellers who moved westward by water via the Erie Canal and the Great Lakes before the railroads were established.  The railroad didn't reach my town until 1872, so all commerce and travel was via water until then.

This is just a wonderful place to live.

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2017, 10:16:59 PM »
The last couple of years I was up there, I worked for a scale service company and i drove between Dowagiac and Marshall and north to Cadillac and all sorts of places along the way, in a chevy pickup with fron 1 to 2000 pounds of calibration weights on it.  Working with equipment that weighed everything from life savers candy to weinies to burnt bones.  Miles and miles of icy cold and no sunshine.  Believe me, I've had the treatment.  I even did a facility Mike Rowe taped a segment at.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2017, 11:00:14 PM »
I was born in North Carolina with an Alabama mother and  I moved to Michigan at age 4 .  A year later in kindergarten the teacher thought I had a speech defect--red was "ray-ed" and there was also "yeller."  She had never heard a southern accent.  She sent me off to the speech therapist who said "the kid just has a southern accent."  Pretty soon it was worked out of me and I and my brothers all ended up sounding just like my Dad, a native of northern lower Michigan.  He went off to school in NC but returned to MI to make his living.  I must have inherited his genetic inclination toward 4-season weather. 

When I took my current job 24 years ago, moving up from Michigan's armpit, Lansing, one big delight was driving all over the place.  Then I handled 6 counties.  Now I'm down to 4.  The only time it's no fun is when I have to be somewhere and the roads are skating rinks.  White knuckles and "why on earth am I doing this?"  But that's rare and maybe it builds character.

Chris Campbell

Motorola Minion

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Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2017, 12:34:47 PM »
Michigan does not sound bad if you can tolerate those prolonged cold/no sun days. I need excuses to stay inside, work in the shop and not feel guilty about it. Its good to hear about weather in a place not near any coast for a change.

It probably gets as hot and humid around those lakes as the inland PA-MD-NJ areas do. I cannot seem to get cool enough but you can always warm up.

I have never been to Erie but have heard its got its own weather due to the lake. One of PA's veteran's homes is there and they just completed a full-facility generator project. I'm sure their weather played a role in that decision.
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