Author Topic: Up north in Michigan  (Read 1457 times)

TC Chris

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1173
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2017, 05:30:31 PM »
Michigan does not sound bad if you can tolerate those prolonged cold/no sun days. I need excuses to stay inside, work in the shop and not feel guilty about it. Its good to hear about weather in a place not near any coast for a change.

It probably gets as hot and humid around those lakes as the inland PA-MD-NJ areas do. I cannot seem to get cool enough but you can always warm up.

I have never been to Erie but have heard its got its own weather due to the lake. One of PA's veteran's homes is there and they just completed a full-facility generator project. I'm sure their weather played a role in that decision.

The Great Lakes tend to make us warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer.  Along the shoreline it's often 5-10 degrees cooler than a few miles inland.  I have a little cottage that I rent for part of the summer.  People come out in the spring to check it out, often wearing their little shorts and t-shirts for the warm weather in town and are greeted with a cool northeast wind off the water.  They shiver and whine and wonder why anybody would want to be at the beach.  A month later in the summer they know why.

We already had some frosts inland here in the north, but none where I am along the shoreline.

Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2017, 08:17:05 PM »
Agreeing with Chris about the Great Lakes and how bad they can get.  During World War II  my Dad was stationed at Pearl Harbor and was there when the Japanese attacked.  A bunch of the "guys" were talking one day and the Captain was listening.  They were talking about weather and sailing all over the world.  My Dad mentioned that the Great Lakes were bad and the "guys" said that they can't be.  The Captain said that Dad was right, that he wanted nothing to do with the Great Lakes, and would take the ocean any day to the Great Lakes.  That being said they are beautiful and a great place to live by especially the west side of Michigan or the Lake Michigan side.  The entire coast is beautiful especially from Whitehall area north to the bridge. 

Bill

electra225

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2017, 08:57:39 PM »
Aren't the Great Lakes the site of some famous shipwrecks?  The "Edmond Fitzgerald" comes to mind. 
If it ain't broke, call me.  I can break it....

Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2017, 09:18:12 PM »
Yes they are!  Chris mentioned earlier in this thread about the "Edmond Fitzgerald".  There are lots of ships at the bottom of the Great Lakes.

Bill

amglow

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 383
  • Durham, NC
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #19 on: October 03, 2017, 07:36:10 AM »
I have fond memories of the "Edmond Fitzgerald" as a youngster in the late '60's-very early 70's at the Huron, OH docks.  If we were passing by and the Hulett ore unloaders were working their magic, my parents would stop the car on the side of the road for a few minutes and let us marvel at these mechanical wonders as they unloaded the ships.  I remember seeing the "Edmond Fitzgerald" there a couple of times, prior to her demise in Lake Superior.
Paul

Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2017, 12:18:11 PM »
That's a cool picture.  Growing up in Michigan our summer vacations were always spent across the "Bridge" or in Upper Michigan and often around Sault Sainte Marie where there is another bridge that goes into Canada and the Soo Locks.  If I remember right,  west of the Locks was a piece of equipment that looks similar to your picture.  It's on the Canadian side.  Sault Sainte Marie Canada has some foundry looking buildings around that area.  The Soo Locks is another cool place to visit.  Lots of ships pass through the locks and it's a fascinating watch.  Also at the Soo Locks is the worlds longest Hydro Electric plant.  It's a 1/4 mile long and is fed by a man made channel. 

Bill

19and41

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 461
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #21 on: October 04, 2017, 11:04:03 PM »
I was stationed in Wiesbaden Germany when I first heard The Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald.  It came as a surprise to most of us that the wreck occurred only a few months before. 
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke

TC Chris

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1173
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2017, 08:45:59 PM »
I'm just back from 2 weeks in Spain and Portugal, where we had temps in the 80s and 90s.  Now back home where it's still 60s, but not for long.

"Lake Huron rolls, Superior sings
In the rooms of her ice-water mansion
Old Michigan steams like a young man's dreams
The islands and bays are for sportsmen
And farther below, Lake Ontario
Takes in what Lake Erie can send her
And the iron boats go as the mariners all know
With the gales of November remembered"

The Great Lakes are a shipwreck collection.  Read here about the Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary: 
https://thunderbay.noaa.gov/

And read here about the great Storm of 1913, when 19 ships went down and another bunch were stranded: 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Lakes_Storm_of_1913

In the Lakes we don't have destructive marine critters nor corrosive salt, but recently we've been invaded by foreign zebra and quagga mussels that cover everything up.

IN addition to the Edmund Fitzgerald wreck, I can recall waking up as a kid to news that the Carl D. Bradley had gone down in a storm in 1958, another victim of the Gales of November: 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Carl_D._Bradley

Chris Campbell

Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #23 on: October 18, 2017, 01:26:47 PM »
Hey Chris,

Since you have not posted lately I wondered where you were.  I guess Spain and Portugal explains it.  Did you have fun?  Welcome back to Michigan!

Bill

hermitcrab

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 46
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #24 on: January 01, 2018, 08:56:34 PM »
Yep, the winters can suck in Michigan, .... but the summers along the Lakes make up for all of it, lately I see more licence plates from southern states more and more than I can remember in the summer...
Elton

ed from Baltimore

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2018, 06:51:58 AM »
         Speaking of winter......When I retired from a steeply-hilled evergreen tree area of the Baltimore suburbs to a totally flat Delaware Atlantic coast town named Ocean View (bay view, actually, 2 miles inland from ocean) I thought winters would be much milder, at least that's what the folklore says because of ......... the "moderating effect" on the climate due to ....... the huge "thermal mass" of all that ocean water.   Also the roads are so flat and smooth and straight that what little snow you did get was no problem. Especially since being retired like everyone else in this area......I could spend every day in a warm cozy propane-furnace-heated well-insulated 14 X 70 mobile home surrounded by old tube radios for a lifetime of soldering and troubleshooting and tuning in shortwave stations in the cold static-free winter months.
         
           So halfway through January comes a 3 day long, 2 foot high super cold super windy BLIZZARD. Coastal blizzard, nearby Baltimore got only 2 inches of snow. Apparently the great "moderating" effect of the Atlantic ocean includes the great "windiness buildup" of the flat, obstruction-free ocean and flat coastal shoreland.

           I had to keep an electric heater running in the unheated shed to keep the water pump and tank from freezing, plus leaving a water faucet  dribbling day and night plus pray for continuing electric service for running the furnace and pray even more for strength of the "tie-down" steel cables that these mobile 14 x 70s are supposed to be equipped with. The windier it got, the more one felt each gust would be the one that uprooted the place. This was the first winter in 35 years that the place wasn't "winterized" and shut down like all my neighbors places near me were.

         Winter time has always meant radio hobby time ever since I was 13 years old, with a workbench set up near the ever-running oil boiler, listening to Christmas tunes on a recently revived old radio,  working on another one and keeping one eye on the oil tank gauge level while upstairs my mother was cooking a nice hot meal. I think that's what most of us console-lovers are reliving somewhere in the backs of our  minds as the smell of solder rosin mingles with the chocolaty taste of a warm mug of stovemade hot chocolate and tollhouse cookies.

        If I can feel that sentimental south of the Mason-Dixon line, no wonder so many radio lovers are located in the Michigan and New England northern latitudes.

         I do love this website. The story of the Bell and Howell console purchase and shipment I just read says it all.
                                                       Ed from Baltimore
                                                                         

Bill

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 525
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2018, 11:08:47 AM »
Good winter story Ed.  It can be like that here on Michigan's west coast as well.  Might I suggest you purchase a backup generator just in case.  :) 

Bill

TC Chris

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1173
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #27 on: February 24, 2018, 11:21:09 AM »
Aargh.... my post just disappeared when I got fumble-fingered.  I'll try again.

We've had a disappointing winter in Michigan.  We  had some good cold and snow at the beginning but then we've had too many thaws so most of the snow is gone.  Today is sunny and will hit 40.  This is February??

My winter is the same--indoor projects during the dark season.  This year it has been the 1936 GE and 1937 Zenith and various smaller ones.  The GE is getting refinished and that involves lots of small steps, a little bit each evening.  A couple years back we had a power outage for 36 hours, leading to heating problems, but my shop out in the garage has a gas wall heater that uses no electricity--all convection--so it stayed warm. 

Our winter has been so lousy that last weekend I had the red Mustang ("Pegasus") out on the road.  It was dry & warm, so why not....  This is probably the first time the car has been out of the garage in February.

Now spring is on the horizon and boat work will be my routine.  The older sailboat is from 1961 and has varnished mahogany trim and varnished spruce spars.  I've been caring for that one since 1968 and have spent many hours in the boat barn doing the things that keep her pretty and safe.  The other boat is a 1967 model and she has a varnished mahogany rudder that's in the shop right now, getting some varnish improvements.  One of these days when I retire I can do the electronics stuff AND the boat stuff AND the outdoor activities. 

Chris Campbell

ed from Baltimore

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2018, 12:08:02 AM »
     Well,  I am having a propane powered firepace with a glass front and a vent out the back wall installed before next winter. It has a built in fan but operates fine without it, and sits off of the floor and away from the back wall. The propane delivery people had a catalog of that and an outdoor gas grill  I might also get.
     I still need an electric generator anyway if only to power the water pump, and of course the gas furnace fan motor. I was so used to blinking lights followed by total power loss in Baltimore because of the above ground power lines snaking through the woods everywhere any snow or wind would topple a tree somewhere nearby. During the 2 foot Bethany Beach blizzard last month there was not so  much as a momentary flickering light, which, if I had known, would have made the snowfall more relaxing.
        The furnace flue stayed clear too, it barely protrudes 3 inches from the roof, and the howling wind noises coming from the vicinity of the furnace made me wonder if the pilot light would go out, but it didn't. I was also surprised when the street was plowed as I was the only one in my 33 house neighborhood that stays in town for the winter. Also I couldn't get out of the house for days because the snow drifted up against the outward opening storm doors. And finally, I  wasn't really alone because I saw every variety of animal footprints all over my lawn the next day. The animals themselves I never did see.

19and41

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 461
    • View Profile
Re: Up north in Michigan
« Reply #29 on: February 25, 2018, 07:35:34 AM »
If you are getting propane, that may also be a consideration for powering your generator, then all your fuel needs would be delivered as opposed to chasing another thing down during the tough times.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
Arthur C. Clarke