Author Topic: The Teddy Bear Polka  (Read 134 times)

electra225

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The Teddy Bear Polka
« on: December 16, 2017, 05:13:55 PM »
There are two versions of this old recording.  Allegedly recorded in 1950 on Peter Pan Records, sang by Jack Arthur with Vicky Kasen orchestra.  I have the 7" version, this is the 10" version.  I collect kiddie records and looked for some time for this version.  It is pretty scratchy as presented here.  I am going to record this on tape, then process the tape like it was a record.  If you admit to having heard this song, you are dating yourself.  Captain Kangaroo played this song occasionally.  I found this record online, but I'm not paying $30 for it. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2dwN1XvoO0
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TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2017, 10:24:49 PM »
Kiddie records were my introduction to music.  When I was very young, my parents bought a used GE radio -phono (LC-628 from 1942) for the kids.  It's a tabletop device with a single-play turntable, 78 rpm only.  It doesn't even have an idler wheel retractor device, so the idler tires gets flat spots and it goes thump-thump-thump.  They also bought a bunch of 7" kids' 78s--Golden records and a few others.  They are pretty well worn out now.

The GE is a fairly lo-fi device, with a crystal cartridge and an AC-DC chassis.  It does, however, have a six-tube circuit with an RF amp.
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Chris Campbell


electra225

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2017, 11:41:21 AM »
The music on kiddie records is amazing, if you listen closely to it.  Name artists recorded under pseudonyms for kiddie records.  Frank Sinatra, Eddie Fisher and Patty Page all sang under pseudonyms.  Rosie Clooney and Gene Autry were big enough artists they recorded kiddie records using their real names.  Mitchell (Mitch) Miller got his start in kiddie records.  He and Vicky Kasen were the main orchestra leaders back then for kiddie records.  I found a picture of my first record player.  I still have it.  Mom bought this at Sears in 1946.  I have run this thing a million hours.  I had a diamond needle in it.  Pretty heady stuff for a kid in 1955.



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TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2017, 05:29:08 PM »
Having access to music as a kid is very positive.  "Children's records," to be a bit more formal about it, have the advantage of being simpler and more easily understood.  I recall raiding a 78 collection at my grandmother's house in Alabama.  I'd make different selections now (there were some Count Basie discs that didn't appeal to me at the time--a bit too complex and advanced).  The whole idea is to get kids listening and then to let their tastes develop. 

I can remember arguing with my Dad about rock'n'roll, which he didn't much like.  We were walking home from a fall high school football game.  I had my brand-new Zenith portable radio ( a Royal 675), which pleased me so much that I carried it everywhere).  I relied to his criticism that Frank Sinatra didn't have such a hot voice. It took a few years before I came to understand the artistry in Sinatra's music and in the classic American songs that he chose.  I grin a little every time I pit a Sinatra CD on.

You record player is a pretty rudimentary device, kinda like my second one, an RCA steel "suitcase portable" single-play 4-speed device.  Mine also featured a two-tube amp and a less ambitious speaker than yours (about 4").  But mine is steel, so it won't burn up from having the tubes right under a sheet of plywood....

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2017, 06:51:43 PM »
My old record player needs a cartridge and the turntable reflocked.  That thing gets so hot, the platter gets warm.  The cabinet is basically plywood with Tolex covering.  VERY basic and a cheap model when it was new.  It has a million hours on it.  It has a tone control, which goes from pretty muddy to really muddy.  There is zero treble response, which is why it plays those old scratchy 78's so well.  For Christmas 1959 I got my first four-speed player.  A little Truetone, my pride and joy for years.  It cost $24.88 new, which was good money in those days.



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TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2017, 07:07:02 PM »
Mine was a bottom-of-the-line model when I got it as a b'day present. I'll attach a photo from eBay.  Mine is stashed a distance away so I can't snap a photo.  It has low output now which means either (a) low B+ voltage from a bad selenium rectifier or (b) an aged cartridge.  RCA affixed a sticker indicating that it's certified to have "Golden Throat" tone.  That was an early lesson in advertising misrepresentation.  C'mon, two tubes, 4" speaker, "Golden Throat"???  The "tone" control is a treble-cut device.

And it's an AC-DC chassis in a steel case (shudder).  I can recall playing it outdoors, on a concrete porch in bare feet, and getting the usual AC vibration from running my hand over the case. 

But it did play records, and it did let me expand my musical horizons, and later when I played it through the 12" speaker on a Zenith 10-S-160, it sounded marginally better.

Chris Campbell

TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2017, 07:09:31 PM »
Oops, forgot the photo.

Chris

electra225

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2017, 02:17:43 PM »
My little Truetone still works.  I put a new cartridge in it 30 years ago or so.  I still play 45's and 78's on it.  The flip needle for LP is diamond, a whole $4 at VM Enthusiasts.  I put a hot rod speaker in mine years ago.  I found a 4" dual cone speaker in a cheap stereo speaker cabinet and put that in my Truetone.  Anything was better than the original speaker, which was clock radio quality.  And it had a hard life and was making scraping noises.  The speaker I put in it was one of those with a big magnet and looks better than the original if nothing else.  The Truetone has a 35W4 and a 50C5 and that is it.  The tubes are Truetone branded, Sylvania sourced.  I'm not sure who built it.
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TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2017, 07:16:10 PM »
So that poor 50C5 is doing all the amplifying?  Not gonna shake the floors and windows....  My RCA lives elsewhere (I have stashes all over).  I'll have to get the right model no. and check the tube complement.  For some reason I had in mind that it had a selenium rectifier and two amplifying tubes.  But maybe it's similar to yours.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2017, 07:51:24 PM »
Yep, the 50C5 is doing everything except rectification for the power supply.  I believe it has a 3-volt cartridge.  I broke the tone arm off.  There was an electronics house here in Phoenix that sold me a whole tone arm cheaper than I could buy just the cartridge.  It has an Astatic cartridge, but I don't remember the model anymore.  It has the volume of an AA5 with 50C5 output.  It is no Concert Grand, but it makes a lot of noise for no more than there is to it.....
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Ken Doyle

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2017, 08:24:02 AM »
At least your kiddie phono had a tube, I wasn't as lucky.




TC Chris

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2017, 07:28:09 PM »
Nothing wrong with an acoustic phono.  Apart from my kiddie 78 payer, I also learned about music because my parents bought a house that came with a big Sonora acoustic player in the basement, a mahogany cabinet with an enclosed horn and two drawers to hold records in tilt-out sleeves.  It came with a full set of 78s.  When I needed entertainment, I'd head for the basement and play elderly 78s.  Sousa, other bands, vaudeville singers.  That music was stuff I didn't hear on commercial radio or anywhere else then.

When my parents moved, we hauled the Sonora to a storage unit. We took it apart to move because it was heavy.  The spring-wound motor device, which I had never seen before, was beautiful lacquered brass, a European movement.  It needs refinishing, a repair of a couple of the Queen Anne pad feet, and a rebuild of the reproducer, I'm sure.

The Sonora cabinet was built in the town next door, as it turns out--Saginaw, MI.

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: The Teddy Bear Polka
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2017, 04:07:13 PM »
My older sister had the kiddie records and player when she was little, I had none.  My mother was friends with the music store that she had done business with when she sang professionally and she was able to acquire a color Zenith in 1962, then a Baldwin spinet piano and the payments on those precluded any other entertainment devices.  My father had obtained a console HiFi and that was my phonograph.  See if any of you had ever heard of one,  It was a Murasonde By Whitley Electronics, a small manufacturer in northern Indiana.  It had an end table configured receiver/V-M phono and a massive speaker cabinet and was finished in grained white wood. 
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