Author Topic: For the car guys  (Read 1475 times)

Motorola Minion

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2018, 11:27:03 AM »
Having owned the once-common, non-fastback 1968 Mustang - 289-2V as my second car in the early 80s, that movie really WAS as much fun as "two-lane blacktop" and "vanishing point".

I knew there had to be lots of modifications to that 390/428 FE-block fastback, because mine braked and handled worse than my ex-cop '73 Fury II, that preceded it. My Mustang was repainted and was rusting out for the second time when I sold it in Dallas.  I refused to drive it like I did the cop car too, having a few under-steer events that showed its limits. Never hit anything, a miracle.

 It was a fantastic 17mpg cruiser though and got lots of favorable attention the 2 years I had it.  The guy that bought it had the fist-sized hole in the frame (a notable Ford issue) pointed out to him but bought it anyway.
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TC Chris

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2018, 07:14:19 PM »
The record was a V-M demonstration disc.  I found it in a trash can, covered with cigarette ashes, at a music store where I took trombone lessons when I was in high school.  That means it was probably around 1964, +/- a year.  I snagged it, took it home, and washed it off.  What surprises me is how little it demonstrates.  Maybe people didn't want to hear bass and treble in those days!  You'd think that demonstration discs would be engineered to really show off (maybe flatter) the equipment.

The other photos are my house, "the small house with the large price" as I called it when I bought it.  One photo includes me  wearing my winter bicycle commuting garb.  I ride to work (only a mile) with a winter bike--studded tires, fenders, flashing lights.  Can't recall why I snapped the pic, but it got posted here because I misread the image numbers when posting.

Now there's a house two blocks away selling for $1.6 million.  The owners tore down a very handsome, gracious 1940s house and built out to the setback lines.  The new one is quite unattractive but it is large.  They moved in 2 years ago and now they're selling.  I have ever understood rich people.  But hey, the ugly large house runs up the  value of my small, vinyl-sided one, so I won't complain too loudly.

Chris Campbell

TC Chris

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2018, 07:23:54 PM »
Having owned the once-common, non-fastback 1968 Mustang - 289-2V as my second car in the early 80s, that movie really WAS as much fun as "two-lane blacktop" and "vanishing point".

I knew there had to be lots of modifications to that 390/428 FE-block fastback, because mine braked and handled worse than my ex-cop '73 Fury II, that preceded it. My Mustang was repainted and was rusting out for the second time when I sold it in Dallas.  I refused to drive it like I did the cop car too, having a few under-steer events that showed its limits. Never hit anything, a miracle.


One of the articles noted that the Charger in the movie was much faster than the Mustang so they had to ease off to make it look competitive.  But that's the great miracle of movie editing--the process can create a new reality.  It's why we go to the movies!

When I was younger my Dad was driving around in a 1966 Plymouth Fury III wagon 383/2 bbl. with the "sport suspension" and front disc brakes, their first year.  The wheel covers said "disc brakes."  It was a very nimble large car.  I was always tempted to drive it way too fast because it was so competent.  My brother had talked my mother into buying a 1969 Olds 4-4-2.  I later owned it.  For some reason, that one always made me keep the speed down. 

Chris Campbell

Alfista

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2018, 09:30:56 AM »

I knew there had to be lots of modifications to that 390/428 FE-block fastback, because mine braked and handled worse than my ex-cop '73 Fury II, that preceded it.


I also had a '68 coupe- 6cyl/3spd in the 80's. As hard as I tried, that poor thing just couldn't be a sports car.
But as Carroll Shelby demonstrated, it really doesn't take too much to make the GT version a serious contender on the track.
I had a high-school buddy with a '65 289/271HP K-code GT and it was impressive in the mid 80's. It was strong up to about 130 and was solid as a rock. Mine felt like a tractor in comparison.


 I love the fact that the McQueen car is unrestored. A little rust, dull paint, are those Cragar wheels? Makes me want to give it a pat on the back and a spirited drive in the country.

-Tim

walyfd

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2018, 10:01:55 AM »
Untouched, unrestored cars are the hot thing now.  Like a Chippendale chair with ratty upholstery and black oxidized finish is worth 10x one that looks like it did in 1750...

This car can't be touched.  At all.  Ever.  I wouldn't even vacuum it.  Given its provenance, it'd make a great museum piece.

Friend of mine had the Cadillac Dutchess--Wallace Simpson and prince edward's car.  The most magnificent restoration I ever saw.  Had a tough time selling it. 

I'm looking at a car now that I believe is original paint.  It's white, my least favorite color especially on a big car.  If I were to repaint it black, it'd probably add value as it'd be easier to sell to a larger audience.  Leaving it original, however, would attract the growing "original" market...  it'd be like putting coral lipstick on the Mona Lisa.

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2018, 11:37:35 AM »
I am lucky, perhaps, in that I don't have to make the "original vs restored" decisions.  Others have made them for me--like the guy who ran the red light (drunk) and smacked my Mustang.  Or the lady who didn't stop in Raleigh, NC and smacked into the back of the '65 Olds.  I'm not sure who to blame for the '61 Chevy--it had to live through three teenage boys starting with me, plus Michigan road salt.  It has original paint (really good acrylic lacquer) on the trunk, hood, and doors, plus the original convertible top and upholstery.  And the '38 Buick... they just didn't know much about the effects of road salt back then, so the fenders (etc.) kinda melted away.  I found 4 fenders in AZ back in the '60s.  That car is my next project and I'm giving serious thought to paying somebody to do it for me o it gets done before I'm 90.

My theory is that unrestored-original is the right decision for vehicles that are pretty much intact.  For lesser ones, the ones like mine that have had their share of experiences already, there's no harm in making them look good.  It's like the 1936 GE radio I'm working on now.  It was beat up, with the finish gone and veneers peeling from moisture exposure and a hole poked in the grille cloth.  It was worth nothing before, which is exactly what I paid for it, and when I'm done it should be functional and handsome enough to sit in the house.  "Restoring" is a value enhancement for it.  But if somebody inherited their great-grandmother's version that is all original with a few dings and scratches, that one's a candidate for preservation.

Chris Campbell

danrclem

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2018, 12:16:41 PM »
When I was a senior I high school I had a 1967 Mustang GTA coupe.  The first weekend I got out of school I went out to celebrate with some of the guys.  Well you probably have been there and know what that means. 

There was a fight at the local hangout and the cops were called.  I was leaving to go home when a cop arrived and my good buddy in the back seat decided to yell some obscenities at the cop.  The cop promptly made a U-turn and I decided to try and get away.  The chase lasted several miles.  I had some distance between us but couldn't lose him.  I went through a parking lot with another exit but I went into a slide while exiting and slid on top of a concrete wall (very short one) on the side of a culvert.  That was the end of the chase but not the excitement.  I got to spend some time in the county jail with some very upstanding citizens.  My very first and very last time being locked up.

Very stupid but I did learn a lesson.

walyfd

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2018, 01:14:32 PM »
And that friend was your best man???

Or is he still in jail?

Ah, youth...  and when we had cars we actually gave a damn about...

TC Chris

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2018, 04:48:39 PM »
I managed to get my brother thrown in jail.  He came to visit me at college with a friend of his, and I took them drinking at the bar that never got raided.  Well, that night it did.  I saw what was happening and headed through the kitchen & out the back door.  I headed back to campus to raise the bail money and sprung 'em that night.  My vehicle?  The '61 Chevy convertible, the one that is resisting my efforts to make it start.  My 50th high school reunion was a couple years ago.  I saw an old friend whom I had not seen since graduation.  His first question:  "Do you still have the Chevy?"  He didn't have to say which Chevy.  That one is "the Chevy."

Chris Campbell

walyfd

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2018, 06:17:41 PM »
Like I say:  just add alcohol and watch it fizz...

TC Chris

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #25 on: February 10, 2018, 07:18:01 PM »
There are various mnemonic devices for remembering how to deal with magnetic deviation and variation (or declination for landlubbers).  They help you remember the sequence from compass to magnetic to true north and back again, and whether to add or subtract the local error.  One of them going from the true direction to the compass reading ends with "Add whiskey, subtract ethics." (Add westerly error, subtract easterly).  Or you can remember "true virgins make dull company at weddings."

Chris Campbell

danrclem

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #26 on: February 10, 2018, 09:02:21 PM »
And that friend was your best man???

Or is he still in jail?

Ah, youth...  and when we had cars we actually gave a damn about...

No, he wasn't my best man.  ;D  My best man was a friend I had at that time but for some reason he wasn't with us that night.

My good buddy in the back seat had a habit of getting into trouble and that's why I quit hanging out with him.  It's hard to say how much trouble he got in after I lost touch with him.

Yeah I really liked that car.  I had to sell it to pay for that night's expenses.  It had a 289 in it and while I like to think I drove like Steve McQueen that night I'm sure it was nowhere near that level.

ed from Baltimore

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2018, 04:40:57 AM »
   
   
   At least in that movie, the sound man probably didn't have to add extra tire-squealing noise to the sound track, even if they did use tire smoke generators.
   I wonder if Steve McQueen's Mustang cranking noise would sound like my old '72 Mercury wagon's 351 cranking noise which always started off with a distinctive "clunk".
    I've had 4 '55 Buicks, 2 Roadmaster 2-dr. hardtops (Jay Leno's first car ?) and 2 Supers, all with the same size V8 although I swear the Roadmasters seemed smoother somehow, and the starter motor sound on the TV reruns of Highway Patrol with their '55 Buicks has the exact same distinctive cranking noise. It's as distinctive as that neighing horse sound on the 60's Chrysler cars.
      Most cars I can't tell from anything, but 60's era Ford and Buick V8s usually I can. Old Perry Masons are good for engine cranking noises, someone's always running from the murder scene, jumping into a fifties car and roaring off . 
   
    This typical male teenager I knew back when  I was also a typical male teenager would always cut his steering wheel hard to one side so that the back tires squealed when he opened the four barrels as he pulled the last 40 feet into his (and mine) Hess station hangout. He used to brag that his brother was a mechanic so it didn't matter how often his transmission went up

Motorola Minion

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #28 on: February 12, 2018, 12:26:19 PM »
 It had a 289 in it and while I like to think I drove like Steve McQueen that night I'm sure it was nowhere near that level.
[/quote]

That Autolite 2100 carb could only dump so much gas into my 289, so it was a pooch over 80 mph. I rebuilt it and did all the adjustments but it was a limiting factor along with the compression ratio and stock heads. I refused to upgrade to a 4V though as it had 105K miles, but when the Y-pipe broke, I put headers and turbo-Z mufflers on it. Loud and false advertising with glass-packs. I had enough trouble getting stopped, as all of us did with old cars that looked good. Those babysitting local cops were always on us for little to nothing.

I ended up selling it right after I rebuilt the C4 auto trans, when it no longer shifted into 3rd gear. A older, wiser motorhead buddy told me not to manually downshift a C4 but with that floor shifter it was irresistible.

One the stock 68 would do was beat about any post-1971 small-block V8 with a 2 barrel off the line at a red light ;), But never on a wet road with that blasted open rear. No highway top-end duels with friends, always was left behind, even by Mopar 318's.
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danrclem

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Re: For the car guys
« Reply #29 on: February 12, 2018, 07:41:07 PM »
I had enough trouble getting stopped, as all of us did with old cars that looked good. Those babysitting local cops were always on us for little to nothing.

I ended up selling it right after I rebuilt the C4 auto trans, when it no longer shifted into 3rd gear. A older, wiser motorhead buddy told me not to manually downshift a C4 but with that floor shifter it was irresistible.

My son has a 1964 1/2 Mustang that we restored in the late 90's when he was in high school.  It was originally rangoon red but he wanted it to be candy apple red so I painted it with that color.  I put a non-functional Shelby hood scoop on it and he bought some SS Cragars for it.  He put glass packs on it with no tailpipes so it was loud.  It looked and sounded fast but it wasn't.  It had a 260 2bbl engine with an automatic transmission.

The local cops followed him around and even pulled him over for nothing trying to catch him doing something.  They finally got him one time when he came to a rolling stop at a stop sign.

Did you check the modulator valve on the transmission.  If it's bad or the vacuum hose is unhooked I don't think a C4 will shift into third gear.