Author Topic: Country music concerts  (Read 595 times)

electra225

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Country music concerts
« on: February 18, 2018, 10:31:49 PM »
My wife and I attended the Miranda Lambert concert in Phoenix the other evening.  The last concert I remember going to was Tammy Wynette in the 1990's.  Tammy Wynette has been gone for probably close to twenty years.  A Miranda Lambert concert was on the wife's "bucket list" so I was willing to attend with her, although I have/had ZERO interest in Miranda Lambert.


LOUD.  That is the one word that best sums up Miranda Lambert's "music."  She claims it to be country music.  Not to me.  Sounds more like Guns And Roses or KISS than it does country.  She uses the same words, just moves them around to make the song sound different.  Same beat, same tempo.  Rap set to a steel guitar.  She does not sing in the sense of Patsy Cline or Connie Francis.  She kind of talks at a different pitch.  She performs mostly songs she has written herself.  The theme is predominantly about "getting dumped" and "getting over it."  The audience was predominantly young women.  Everybody had their cellphones out, texting, taking pictures and, during a certain song, turned on some kind of light on their cellphones to give a certain ambience to the song.  Everyone had their arms held up, swaying back and forth, and they knew every word to every song Ms. Lambert sang.  The only song of hers I was familiar with, the one about the little red wagon with the axle busted, was one she did not sing.  She never sang an upbeat "boot scooting" song, nor did she sing ballads or belly-rubbers. 

Even with ear protection, it was too loud.  I stuffed my ears with Kleenex and used hearing protection.  The music was too loud even in the restroom, across the hall.  One has to wonder about OSHA at these concerts.  In this town, everyone who runs equipment has to wear hearing protection.  Even backhoe and skiploader operators have to wear hearing protection.  How to do the ushers and others who work in the venue get by with no hearing protection?  Our usher has hearing protection, the ear muff type.  He lifted one side up if you spoke to him, and promptly returned it.  There were two banks of speakers across from where we sat.  Looked like maybe 12 18" drivers in each bank.  There were two smaller banks of horns.  The sound seemed like it came from everywhere.  If they used the stadium speakers, there were several more around the perimeter of the stadium.  Probably 100 watts real was all that was needed to power these fairly effecient speakers.  Why does it have to be so blamed loud?  You could not understand the lyrics or identify the instruments.  All there was was boom and bang.  The drummer probably had a dozen various doodads he banged on.  There were three bass drums, two set up on "auto-boom".  Instead of having the bass drum beat at a regular interval, it would go boom, boom, boom.  Then boom.  The bass was so strong you could feel it in your chest downstairs on your way out of the stadium.  I did not see a bass guitar.  The bass was set up like is typically heard in rock or rap music.  I'd like to see what kind of speakers they used that will attain and sustain that type of volume on a steady basis.


She had a five-monitor panel set up behind her on stage.  This is the only way one could view the artist.  She was about an inch tall from where we were sitting.  Like watching TV and having no control over the volume.  Her music is not really that bad.  Played at lower volume, her concert would have been fairly pleasant, if not something I would choose myself.  Jon Pardi, an artist I was not familiar with, was an opening act along with some lady who was too "rocky" for me.  MR Pardi reminds me of a young George Strait.  Quieter, his act would have been the best of the evening.  He was fairly hardcore country by modern standards. 


I will likely not attend another concert, and certainly not a Miranda Lambert concert.  If I do attend another concert, I will bring heavy-duty commercial grade hearing protection along. 
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

TC Chris

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2018, 12:37:12 AM »
The commercial producers fail to grasp the difference between loud and excruciating.  At home, I do like a bit of loudness now and then.  Same in the car.  But it's not painful.  Excruciating is painful. 

Part of the problem is that it's easy to do it today.  We have enormous amplifiers and huge speaker banks that can put out vast amounts of noise.  Somehow  the people who put shows on have lost the distinction between "can" and "should."  We do not need to be deafened to enjoy music. 

It's especially puzzling when bands are hired for events like wedding receptions.  You've got a big group of people, many of whom are related, and probably living all over the country.  So they all come together for a big event, and pretty soon the band sets up and plays at excessive levels so all conversation stops.  Me, I'd rather have a chance to talk to people I haven't seen in a long time, or maybe to some new acquaintance.  To be fair, I guess it's OK when the music starts a bit later and the young folks want to dance.  At a wedding last summer they did that, and it was outdoors and the neighbors were tolerant, so those of us who wanted to chat could retreat far enough to reduce the sound levels. (That wedding was a niece's and I performed the ceremony.  I got ordained online for one niece's wedding  and it worked so well that two more asked me to do theirs.) When you're stuck indoors, there's no defense except stuffing your ears with tissue or leaving. 

The last commercial arena concert I attended was Bruce Springsteen a long time ago.  It took a day for my ears to stop ringing.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2018, 08:58:39 AM »
I like to exercise the old Magnavox occasionally.  But not THAT loud.  I could not make sense out of anything.  My tinnitis is somewhat better this morning than yesterday morning.  That type of volume on a consistent basis can't be good for one's hearing.  There will be an artist sued one of these days most likely alleging hearing damage.  Part of their job is keeping people safe.  We had to walk thru a metal detector on our way in.  That was a first for me as well.  It had to be well over 200 db in there.  I don't remember anymore what OSHA in AZ wanted in the workplace as far as noise was concerned.  Seems to me like it was 60 db max sustained.
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

danrclem

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2018, 06:20:15 PM »
It sounds like a concert that I wouldn't want any part of.

We went to see the Bellamy Brothers last fall in a venue that held less than 800 people.  It was one of the nicest places I've been to but the sound system stunk.  It was a little louder than I liked but the sound was garbled.  It was hard to understand the words but I knew what most of them were anyway.

We go to a place called Renfro Valley once in awhile that's also nice but the sound system is too loud.  Most people would probably be OK with it but loud harsh sounds hurt my ears.  It's not a real big place and people are well behaved in a family atmosphere.  We have saw Merle Haggard, Don Williams, John Anderson, the Oak Ridge Boys and others there.  If Charlie Pride ever comes back I want to see him too.

The Grand Ole Opry is also a very nice family oriented place.  The sound there is probably the best I have ever heard.  I've saw many country music celebreties there.  The only bad part about the Opry is that most of good ones are retiring or passing on.

We're planning on going to see Alan Jackson if he ever comes fairly close to us.  I wish I could've saw Johnny Cash and Randy Travis but it's too late to see those guys.

 

Bill

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2018, 07:33:42 PM »
Other than Theater Pipe Organ Concerts I have not attended a vocal/band concert in years, and for the same reason being discussed here.  It's to LOUD and my ears can't stand it.  For an old fart I have not lost any hi frequency pitch.  I have trouble with the human voice especially in crowds.  I don't do any pipe organ tuning anymore because I can't stand tuning the little pipes.  They are all very hi pitch and my ears start plugging up. I guess that must be a natural protection.  Years ago when I was in college I went with a roommate to hear Doc Severinsen (roommate was a fan) at the big auditorium at college which had very good acoustics.  Everything had microphones including the drummer.  Doc himself had a mic and had the mic stuck about half way up his horn.  I had fingers in both ears and had no trouble hearing every sound and even then it was too loud.  Do I turn my music up at home....YES I do....but it's not painful.

Bill

TC Chris

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2018, 08:48:49 PM »

We go to a place called Renfro Valley once in awhile that's also nice but the sound system is too loud.  Most people would probably be OK with it but loud harsh sounds hurt my ears.  It's not a real big place and people are well behaved in a family atmosphere. 
 

Long ago there was an AM radio weekly broadcast--Renfro Valley Barn Dance??--from there.  When I was a kid, the family would pack into the station wagon at spring break and head south, often to visit family in Alabama or to spend a week on the Gulf coast or maybe on the NC shoreline.  On one of the trips we detoured through Renfro Valley to check it out.  I don't recall that there was much to see at the point--maybe just the building where the event happened.

Chris Campbell

danrclem

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2018, 09:52:29 PM »
I'm going to guess that you visited a long time ago.  There's probably more to it now but it's still not big.  They have two places where they have shows.  The Big Barn and the Old Barn.  You can stand in back of the Big Barn and watch the entertainers go in but some of them don't go in until the last minute.  When I was down there Merle came out and shook hands with people but I wasn't there at the time.  He was in bad health and it wasn't long before he passed.  William Lee Golden went around shaking hands with everybody.

Here's a link to Renfro Valley and the Renfro Valley Barn Dance that I haven't ever heard of until now.  If you ever get into that area again I think you'd like to see a concert there.  It's very nice.

I may have to buy tickets to a concert to go there this year and I might even camp out.

http://www.renfrovalley.com/

http://www.hillbilly-music.com/programs/story/index.php?prog=230

ed from Baltimore

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Re: Country music concerts
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2018, 12:08:26 PM »
The last few wedding receptions I've been to, the music at first was loud but not too loud and I thought "this isn't too bad"  Plus the selection was actually pleasant older music. But all that was deceptive. The DJ apparantly wanted to entice us geezer types onto the dance floor and get us winded and worn out as soon as possible so we would collapse back into our chairs. That cleared the dance floor for all the youngsters to come up and dance or should I say jump up and down with their hands stabbing up and down into the air. For them the music was unbelievably loud. It also had an added bass beat that never let up, even when one song ended and the next one began. So now I know what to expect at these affairs-- pain and suffering.

A friend begged me to come to her son's bands concert. She said I would love his style of  music, so I foolishly attended. Everyone else there was under 21 except for a few of us geezers. The concert was in a old movie theatre that had had all the seats removed. The music was again, unbelievably loud and somehow, no matter how far you moved to the back of the room, it never got less loud. I was wearing dress pants with a thin loose fabric and when a loud bass note blasted out, my pantscuffs would flap like a pennant in  the breeze. All the kids attending were standing up, since there were no seats, and jabbing their hands up and down in the air and pointing their fingers into the ceiling and jumping up and down.
      My neighbor took me to see Rigaletto at Baltimore's Lyric theatre. Our seats were in the balcony on one side overlooking the orchestra below. The music was so beautiful you wanted to do a swan dive over the balcony into the orchestra below. For the next few days I was humming the songs out loud wherever I went.