Author Topic: Storms  (Read 979 times)

MEZLAW

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Storms
« on: March 04, 2018, 03:08:58 PM »
Anyone else effected by the storms in the north east?   We got over 24 hours of wind and power is out all over Virginia and several other states.  I've been without power since Friday morning. It went out at 9 AM and we are still without it!

walyfd

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Re: Storms
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2018, 04:17:14 PM »
Basically a  typical winter in NE PA...  Poconos got hit hard and a guy I work with is without power for 2 days.  That's a bit rare but, overall, it's still a typical winter.  I made it to the office Friday but left early.  Roads were plowed so I had no problems.

I think '93 and '96 were worse.  And the Valentines Day blizzard of '04 or whenever it was.

19and41

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Re: Storms
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2018, 05:06:43 PM »
It's been quite mild here this February and still is.  I just spent 4 hours installing a 45 minute storm door.  It was in the upper 60's.
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TC Chris

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Re: Storms
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2018, 05:50:45 PM »
Here in NW lower  Michigan, we are just coasting on mediocre weather.  Our snow is all gone and it was almost 40 degrees at my house today. Boo.  This is supposed to be winter, not mud season.  The apple and cherry growers are concerned about a hard freeze after all this warmth--it kills the buds, then the blossoms and then the fruit.  The big weather event of snow was down in the Detroit area, far from the snow belt, last week.  I will knock on wood after saying this, but we've had no extreme weather of any kind.  I have a small summer cottage on the other side of the state, on a Great Lake shoreline.  In 1946 it was knocked down by ice blown ashore in spring.  The ice gets weaker in warmer weather and a strong onshore wind can start it moving.  Once a huge sheet of ice starts moving, it does not stop easily--too much mass.  After that movement, and with rising Great Lakes levels, the original owner rebuilt the little house and built a seawall so the place would not wash away.  8 years ago the ice started moving, came over the seawall in a pile that was at least 20' high on top of the seawall, and came within 10 feet of the house.  I am hoping for nothing dramatic.

I have been riding my summer commuter bicycle for the last few days--the one with no fenders, no studded tires. 

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Storms
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2018, 07:08:35 PM »
Michigan tart cherries are hard to beat.   ;D
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ed from Baltimore

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Re: Storms
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2018, 01:32:26 AM »
      Well I am affected in a Magnavox console sort of way. Last weekend, I was set to rent a panel truck on the Delaware coast, head west over the the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which must rise a good hundred feet above the water and, with a refrigerator, return east from Baltimore with my aunt's '61 (tuning meter, not magic eye) Magnavox French Provincial console.
    The winds were so fierce that the Bay Bridge was actually totally shut down for just about the entire day of Friday, my intended travel day. Usually they restrict large closed vans when the wind is bad enough, or shut down some lanes or lower the speed limit,  but this time it was totally shut down. It was scary enough heading over the bridge the next day in a passenger car.
      I am staying at a Marriott near Baltimore's airport and I got my sister the last available room cuz my niece she lives with has lost electricity. Her husband actually bought a generator after everyone in the area had lost power. So that makes two surprises-----that a motel room was still available, and that generators weren't sold out. But everyone around here seems to have learned their lesson in the last few years.
     Five years ago, driving down my old street after a windy snowstorm with the car window open, I heard nothing but total silence, now I hear one generator after another when traveling by the houses, and I see a lot of steady lights in the windows. Also, the last time I went down the street I saw house after house with their south
 roofs covered with acres of solar panels. Losing power hurts my street more than usual because we all have wells instead of city water.
      The preparations people make for the next storm relate to the time they spent without power after the last storm. There's a heartwarming feeling when downing strong coffee, eggs and bacon made on a Coleman stove, and hearing the oil burner running on a generator stocked with several full gasoline cans. With any luck I will get that same feeling next winter blizzard when the lights go out---but only for a few seconds because then my automatic LPG powered generator will start itself and the lights go back on along with the heater keeping the well pump and tank from freezing.
      It is truly scary how even the most prepared among us can only go a week or so without power before we're as bad off as someone who made no preparations.   

walyfd

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Re: Storms
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2018, 04:34:53 AM »
I lived in VA Beach for a short time.  I hated that bridge... scary enough on a sunny day.  Couldn't imagine driving it in bad weather.

Just came over our news that PP&L is actually bringing crews back from Puerto Rico to get the Poconos back on the grid...

TC Chris

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Re: Storms
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2018, 11:11:14 PM »
A couple years back we had a winter storm that took out my power--in the city, mind you--for 36 hours.  It was interesting because I was keeping the warmth up a bit with my gas stove.  After a while I started feeling a bit sluggish and realized it was carbon monoxide exposure.  Off went the stove. It was a good lesson and I am lucky  that I knew the danger and the symptoms. In a pinch, I could move into my garage shop, which is heated with  a little wall-mounted convection heater.  All it needs is natural gas.  No fan, and a pilot-light ignition.At my old house I had a steam boiler.  The only electricity it required was for the thermostat and the gas burner valve. In a pinch I could bypass that and raise steam manually to keep the house warm.  That would be boring, of course, and the power there was never off very long.  It was just comforting to know that it was possible to maintain heat.  My current house has a hot water boiler, one with a fan-induced draft (flue exhaust fan), a circulating pump for the water,  and fancy circuit board to sense the right degree of vacuum when the exhaust fan is running and to trigger the electric ignition spark.  Too much electricity....

Chris Campbell

19and41

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Re: Storms
« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2018, 11:42:13 PM »
One other thing that can provide both light and a surprising bit of warmth is a kerosene lamp.  I have a couple of Aladdin mantle type kerosene lamps that light well and did a nice job warming the living room by 3 to 4 degrees.  Deodorized kerosene can be had from Home Depot and the Aladdin does a good job of burning most byproducts of the kerosene flame.
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
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Bill

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Re: Storms
« Reply #9 on: March 06, 2018, 07:55:54 AM »
I'm a little late as usual but I remember an ice storm we had in 2002 where we lost power for 2 1/2 days in Grand Rapids Michigan.  We had a warm up for one day late March with lots of rain.  During the night the temps dropped with rain continuing into the low 20's and power lines went down everywhere.  Thankfully it happened on a Friday so I had the weekend to keep things going.  I did not have a generator but I did have two fireplaces and an Aladdin lamp.  The fireplace in the living room was a gas log so not a lot of good but the fireplace in the family room burned wood and I had lots of it.  I kept warm, cooked in the fireplace, had a battery radio, and the Aladdin lamp to read by.  I put the food that was in the refrigerator in the garage and never opened the refrigerator freezer or the big freezer and everything stayed frozen.  The house I have now has two fireplaces but they are both natural gas with blowers. To get real heat out of them you need electric so I now have a generator that will pretty much run the whole house including the well.  I try to be prepared so I can hold out for a month if necessary, but are we really ever totally prepared!  Having the generator also gives me a peace of mind for summer power outages and keeping the refrigerator/freezer going. 

Just a follow up with Electra 225's comment on Michigan tart cherries.....the sweet cherries are really good too.  :)

Bill

electra225

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Re: Storms
« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2018, 10:04:32 AM »
You're absolutely right, Bill.  I had cherry pie on my mind that day....... ;)


I like the sweets dried and eat them like raisins.
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AC207

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Re: Storms
« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2018, 10:51:26 AM »
The coastal areas took a beating here in Southern Maine and NH but inland we mostly had high winds.  However, we're poised to get 10-18" of new snow tomorrow through Thursday with some more high winds. Guess I better get gas for the snowblower.
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TC Chris

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Re: Storms
« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2018, 08:22:35 PM »
One other thing that can provide both light and a surprising bit of warmth is a kerosene lamp.  I have a couple of Aladdin mantle type kerosene lamps that light well and did a nice job warming the living room by 3 to 4 degrees.  Deodorized kerosene can be had from Home Depot and the Aladdin does a good job of burning most byproducts of the kerosene flame.

I've got a nice Aladdin, but some time back the device that raises & lowers the wick started binding--it cocks over and won;t go.  I bought a new wick and it had the same action.  Any suggestions?

Chris Campbell

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Re: Storms
« Reply #13 on: March 06, 2018, 08:35:49 PM »
Michigan tart cherries are hard to beat.   ;D

We encourage cherry consumption here in Traverse City, the "Cherry Capital."  There's an annual summer Cherry Festival.  But the real secret is dried cherries.  They are priced like gold but have a wonderful sweet/tart taste.  Plus they're available year-round.  The problem with cherries as a crop is ghat they can't be stored, as apples can be.  They have to be consumed right when they ripen, or preserved in some manner.  Drying them is one way.  The only problem with eating dried cherries is that it's hard to stop.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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Re: Storms
« Reply #14 on: March 09, 2018, 11:18:07 PM »
Dried cherries are one of my favorites too.  Actually almost any dried fruit.  ;D

Chris have you tried taking apart your lamp and cleaning the parts.  Aladdin parts are still available if you end up needing a part.  The hardware store in Mackinaw City has some parts, years ago there was a hardware store in Frankenmuth that had lamps and any part you needed.  Of course there is always on-line shopping.  Hope you can make it work!

Bill