Author Topic: About disassembly, cleaning and lubricants  (Read 115 times)

Motorola Minion

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About disassembly, cleaning and lubricants
« on: August 03, 2018, 12:35:16 PM »
I want to preface this by saying that often, changers seem to work fine mechanically. When they don't, you need to mean business, so get down and dirty!

For oiling spinning metal parts, Zoom-Spout turbine oil must bein every record player toolkit. 3 in 1 type and sewing machine seems like appropriate vintage oil to use BUT it is generally sloppy and attracts dirt. Less is better, always.

I used to HATE doing record changers during the 80s, preferring the carried-in 9" to 20" TVs. The TV road tech pulled the changers from consoles and brought back to the shop for us bench toads, and as you can guess, peak season was October-December.

Doing changers was fun - like taking out the trash, so our service manager had a no-fail 8-step method we used on BSR, Magnavox and RCA units pulled from consoles and brought back to the shop by the road tech. "Just do it" I was often told when I verified it was operating correctly, and already looking for a new stylus (often in vain) in the dusty parts drawers.

Lubriplate or white lithium grease ( aka GC's Phono lube) is mandatory for all sliding parts. Go in ONCE with your best stuff and you'll own the repair. Just do it all, forgetting anything will make you repeat those annoying processes.

Isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and alternately, lacquer thinner, Q-tips and shop towels are all that is needed to clean off dirt-encrusted grease. it also does a great job on motor capstan "stepped shafts" plus the inside of the platter along idler track

Rubber-Renu is highly reactive oil of wintergreen and seems to work on most but NOT ALL idler pulleys to remove glaze. Only slightly more effective than IPA. If the pulley has deep fissures in the rubber, it probably overheated when the player motor was left on when it stalled, basically finishing off any chances for a lasting revival. Bite the bullet and replace it.

Bottoms-up work first

1- Mandatory motor maintenance - mark positions of every nut, 6-32 screw, washer, spacer and bearing bracket before you take ANYTHING apart. Soak those bearings first with IPA, using a cotton swab to pull the gunk out. Soak next with Zoom Spout or similar super-thin stuff.

2- Clean the changing mechanism with IPA and shop towels, and yes, you must take cycle gear-wheels off shafts or sliders out completely. Sliders on V-M players are tricky but you will not be successful without a thorough disassembly - cleaning and lube. trip levers that slide must be cleaned and having another player along side to compare whats out of place or bent cannot be understated.

Topside last

1- Pull off the platter from spindle. RCA's need a snap-ring pliers, Mags and BSR use a C-clip and V-M's use a small plastic O-ring and grooved center pin. Most are easy but on BSR's - spindle grease turns into JB weld, and must be soaked with lacquer thinner or worse to get it loose, spin-able and removable. I have yet to try "weasel piss" (WD40 or PB blaster) as it is hard to limit overspray.

2- Take idler pulley off and give it the business with IPA and oil the shaft/spring washers. Check alignment with the motor shaft thru all speed settings. If it does not land in the middle of a step, motor mount grommets are flat/gone OR if solid, it may be improper idle shaft washer placement.

3- Move center pin in/out, up and down while dousing with IPA to get ALL the crud out that causes it to drop two records or operate sluggishly. The tiniest bit of oil is all this part needs.

4- Platter spindle cage/ball bearings and washers need a thorough soaking and de-gumming, here we had success with lacquer thinner also. Pay attention to sandwiching the bearing between TWO thin washers. They like to stick and drop off during disassembly. To keep from hunting parts like those washers and center pin balls (V-M) that bounce off the bench, do your disassembling in a dishwashing tub or big cafeteria tray to catch anything that cuts loose.

5- The grand finale included checking speed with strobe disc under light from incandescent or fluorescent on magnetic ballasts. Try all record sizes/rpms and verify it worked on the 45 adapter, run through all cycles and at 78 (or 45) rpm to distribute all the oil and exercise every operation.

It always worked, no call backs, all the more reason to love Magnavox and RCA changers in particular.
About 5 years ago, I had to re-learn the whole process for Voice-of-Music changers, used in all my Motorola and Zenith tube sets.

I may post a thread on V-M by itself, renowned as rugged YET labor intensive to disassemble and re-assemble :P.
Tubes - Magical - Tubes

Dave

electra225

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Re: About disassembly, cleaning and lubricants
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2018, 02:37:00 PM »
Now, if you would include a shipping address where I could send all the changers I have to you....... ;)

I hate working on changers, if you did not already know that.

You can put a straw on the PB Blaster and it will dribble, not spray.  I love that stuff.   :)

Thanks for sharing that information.  That will help those of us who struggle with working on changers.
I'm great at multi-tasking.  I can listen, ignore, and forget all at the same time.

Bill

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Re: About disassembly, cleaning and lubricants
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2018, 09:29:49 PM »
Thanks David, that's a lot of good info.  Now if I could just apply everything you said and have it work when I'm done.  :)

Bill