Author Topic: Re: Question  (Read 648 times)

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« on: September 29, 2018, 08:56:25 PM »
What does RIAA and FFRR mean on my Magnavox Serenade?

TC Chris

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Re: Question
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2018, 09:33:25 PM »
All LPs have been recorded with equalization.  It cuts the bass and boosts the treble in recording.  In playback, the opposite is done--treble cut, bass boosted.  This allows the stylus to track the groove better, because without it the bass notes would swing the stylus wildly and it would hop out of the groove.  Treble cut also cuts other noise.

In the early days, there were several competing  equalization curves (how much they boosted/cut, and at what frequencies).  RIAA is the one that won out. FFRR was London (Decca in England).  Columbia had another, which is why early Columbia LPs sound so dowdy on newer equipment.  There were others.  I can't remember when RIAA became the standard but Wikipedia would tell us.

Chris Campbell

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2018, 10:13:44 PM »
Thanks a lot just got my Magnavox up and running so I
Needed to know.

ed from Baltimore

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Re: Question
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2018, 03:09:06 AM »
  All the years Magnavox made phonographs, only a few models had selectable playback curves and only for a year or two. I guess the older ones equalized to Columbia LP curve and later switched over to RIAA. The differences were subtle, at least to my untrained ear, and a slight tone control readjustment would have more effect on the tone than switching curves. They always claimed different record labels did their own thing anyway depending on the tastes of the recording engineer.
         As usual the RCA curve won out because their "New Orthophonic" curve for LPs was chosen as the RIAA standard. CBS was probably getting an inferiority complex by now as their color TV standard was dumped for the RCA standard after it had already been accepted and receivers were being manufactured. They invented the LP standard when RCA was pushing their 45 RPMs trying to prevent the LPs from catching on.  Sarnoff must have been studied by Bill Gates for Machiovellian traits.

electra225

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Re: Question
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2018, 05:34:53 PM »
Bill Gates can scarcely carry water for David Sarnoff when it comes to being a hard-nosed businessman.
I don't need Google.  My wife says she knows everything.

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2018, 09:49:37 AM »
My provential serenade plays very strong on the radio but
much lower volume on the record player. Is this normal?

electra225

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Re: Question
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2018, 03:56:37 PM »
I won't tell you it's normal, but it is typical.  If you read Chris's comments about the different equalization curves, that might explain part of it.  Also the cartridge may be somewhat weaker than it was when it was new.  Replacement NOS cartridges might have the same issue.  And there might be a deficiency in the electronics in the phono circuit.  And you might be listening to a strong local radio station that simply has more output than the phono has.  I don't believe than any two of my six Magnavox instruments perform exactly the same way in every regard.  I all depends on how badly it concerns you whether you should do something about it or not.  The cure might be worse than the illness.  Good luck.
I don't need Google.  My wife says she knows everything.

TC Chris

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Re: Question
« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2018, 06:41:42 PM »
Mine lacks the original changer but my other 1956 model,  a Magnasonic, has a plug-in headshell on the tone arm.  You might check the contacts there for cleanliness (use a little DeOxit) and also where the cartridge leads are fastened--are the push-on or soldered?

On my P. Serenade, the phono is adequately loud.  I agree that maybe your cartridge is declining if you have little output on phono.

Chris Campbell

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2018, 07:56:42 PM »
Thanks for the information I will try the deoxit first if not I wi get another cartridge.

TC Chris

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Re: Question
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2018, 09:11:21 PM »
One more thing--my P. Serenade has two or three RCA jacks on the preamp/tuner and they are not clearly labelled.  It took some trial and error to figure out which was a phono input and which was a tape out (the phone will lay through the tape out but you also get the tuner over it).

Chris Campbell

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2018, 09:33:37 AM »
Can you show me where yours is connected at?

AstroSonic100

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Re: Question
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2018, 05:54:06 PM »
The attached picture is the back of my Wedgewood which is a different cabinet style than yours.   Looking at the back of the receiver chassis, the jack on the far left is tape output.  On the right are two jacks.  The one on the left is from the phono.  The jack on the right is the AUX input.  I have a "Y" adapter from my portable CD player connected to AUX.
Also, my set shows a lot of additional wiring because of the stereo conversion kit for the phono.

Sorry about the picture quality. It's an old picture taken with an older digital camera.

Ray

Mel Layrisson

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Re: Question
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2018, 06:18:39 PM »
I can't make out where you phone wire goes since mine is mono.

AstroSonic100

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Re: Question
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2018, 07:04:47 PM »
The chassis number for the receiver chassis in my set is CR730. There should be two jacks right next to each other on the right rear of the receiver chassis. The left jack is phono and the right is aux.
Ray

TC Chris

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Re: Question
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2018, 08:17:40 PM »
My '56 PS has a CR726AA tuner/preamp.  The phono input is the left-hand jack located on the right side of the chassis, looking at it from the rear.  I notice that  it's labelled "PH" so I wonder why I was stumped originally.  Note that the board holding the antenna connections is probably not in the original position but it works for me.

Chris Campbell