Author Topic: We need to start a GE board on here!  (Read 7611 times)

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2019, 08:08:30 PM »
The one I did for Don in 2014 sure sounded nice.  It is not a Concert Grand, but it sounds really impressive for what it is.  Mine was built in Decatur, IL like the others were.  Decatur must have been GE's audio plant.  Wonder what else they built there besides stereos?
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Bill

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2019, 05:50:32 AM »
Maybe Mr. Google can answer that question.   ;)

Bill

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2019, 09:25:45 AM »
In the next day or so, I'm going to try the "Dr. VM" suggestion you gave me on the cartridge for the Trimline 300 I've got.  It has a dead crystal cartridge.

You know me.  I'd rather have a conversation with a breathing human than I would Mr. Google.   ;) ;)
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Motorola Minion

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2019, 12:26:38 PM »
Greg,  Which one did you have the amp on that looked like this, RP-2060?

On this GE console the model number was missing, printed in fading red ink on those white labels like Zenith used, I have no idea what the model is. It is a V-M changer and made in Decatur, Ill.

GE had the TV department in Syracuse until the 70s, radios and small portable RC's were built in Utica and the larger portables and consoles in Decatur, until???.

Most buying GE were value shopping and/or liked the design, so the more expensive ones (with 7189 and 7355 tubes) seem pretty rare.
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Dave

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #19 on: April 24, 2019, 04:42:49 PM »
That appears to be the tube lineup for the 2060.  The chassis is configured slightly differently.  The power transformer is on one end of the chassis and the output transformers on the other end.  There is a metal cover over the chassis on the 2060 because the tubes hang upside down.  GE used the same chassis in different combinations.  I have an ugly console that has the same amp as the 1590 I got.  It has four tubes, but three of them are different than the 2060.  GE used 7189's and 6CA4's in relatively cheap little stereos.  One of these tubes is worth more than the whole stereo is. 

GE puts a paper, usually covered in dust where you can't see it, in their instruments to tell model numbers and tube complement.  There is no standard place for it, either.  It could be anywhere or nowhere.  Other than that, you can look thru Beitmans for something close to what you have, basing your search on tube complements.  GE did not use the best ink on their documentation stickers.

The schematic for a RP2080 is what I'm using.  The 2080 has a function switch to be used with a tuner.  The tuner is a separate deal, like Magnavox did theirs.  I don't know what a 2080 is.  It might be what you have.  I see yours has a function switch.  Does it have a tuner?
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firedome

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2019, 08:02:48 AM »
GE also had an audio division that made their TOL components in the mid-late '50s to early '60s in Auburn NY. Made some impressive component mono and Stereo Classic series of amps and i believe tuners. I had one of the stereo amps a few years ago, it had some serious iron. They also had some large speaker systems, our neighbor in Baltimore had some, not sure where they were made.
Happy Motoring! from Roger in NY

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2019, 09:50:50 AM »
I found a little GE clock radio in my hoard that was built in Decatur.  It is a fairly late one, maybe 1966 or so.  GE is not well-regarded for their home entertainment equipment, mainly due to their rather chintzy printed circuit boards.  But, the more I dig into their stuff, the more impressed I am with how well it works compared to how it was built.  These little GE stereos were sold to a price point.  There are not a lot of frills.  But you can see the progression in that price point.  My little one has three tubes, a 9-inch platter and a Ronette crystal cartridge.  The "biggest" one I have, the 2060, has an 11-inch platter, a GE C-100 ceramic cartridge, 8" speakers with a 3" tweeter, crossover network, separate tone controls, and a transformer power supply.  All three I have, plus the 1590 are all 1963 models.  Each of the three Trimline stereos I have are different.  The cabinets are embossed painted aluminum.  These little stereos were designed to be a first stereo for either a teenager or someone who did not have room for a console stereo.  The only similarity these have to a big Magnavox is that they run on household current and are stereo.  The similarities end there.  They have workhorse VM changers, not the highest-tech changers built, but certainly one of the more rugged.  The downside to these little stereos is restoration cost.  It is the same as for a big Magnavox.  I'll have $100 each in each of these things by the time I go thru the electronics, buy a drive tire, motor mounts, one needs a cartridge, needles, it all adds up.  I'm not certain of market value, but I wouldn't give $100 for one, redone and 100% perfect.  I have a total of $3 purchase money in five GE stereos.  So far, I'm golden in that regard.  I'm trying to decide if pursuing these rather fun little stereos makes sense.  They sure are fun to play with and WAAAAYYY simpler than a Magnavox console.

The Trimline series eventually became solid state with GE-built changers.  They were almost indestructible.  My step-dad was a GE dealer back in the day.  He always maintained that GE built just as high-end instruments as the "big boys" if you knew where to look.  Some of the GE color TV sets he had on the floor looked like the contemporary RCA and Zenith models to my untrained eyes.
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Motorola Minion

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2019, 03:00:23 PM »
My first TV-tech job was in a repair shop of a furniture dealer that sold GE TV and Appliances about 1978, after consoles were out of fashion, they also picked up Magnavox TV - by then owned by NAP. 

GE color TVs were basic RCA clones from 1962-1965. They made a few changes to use their own tubes, like 12-pin compactrons. In 1966, they made both a Porta-color and a console TV chassis like no other, with a simplified color circuit, not necessarily better. The 1969-70 models using 19" and 23" CRTs were GE's best all-tube color sets and scored well in CU tests. Mediocre tuners and circuit boards aside, I learned much working on them that also applied to other makes.

I disliked the GE color TVs from 1971-73, which were really cheapened using Porta-color style series filament and plastic chassis construction, absolutely NO improvements over the previous except they were lighter. Motels seemed to buy lots of them, like the cheaper RCA models, both still using mostly tubes. The last porta-color to use tubes was a 1978 model.

In 1973-4, the first all solid state TV's by GE were not bad at all compared to XL-100 and Chromacolor, except their tuner reception using an antenna improved little. Over time, they proved to supply OEM parts at a reasonable price which made repairs easy and by 1978, most of their line was pretty easy to diagnose and repair.
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Dave

Motorola Minion

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2019, 03:21:23 PM »
GE also had an audio division that made their TOL components in the mid-late '50s to early '60s in Auburn NY. Made some impressive component mono and Stereo Classic series of amps and i believe tuners. I had one of the stereo amps a few years ago, it had some serious iron. They also had some large speaker systems, our neighbor in Baltimore had some, not sure where they were made.

Musaphonic was the term used for the very best GE equipment back in the 30s and 40s, like Magnavox had Imperial.

My clock radio from 1970 was made in Utica, and pretty sure my first "swinger?" plastic clamshell record player was made there also after the Decatur plant was closed. It was a 1973 with an automatic changer and a feeble solid state amp with a small oval speaker. When I connected an external speaker, it barely could drive it. Changer was like GE-made unit in picture, and used a Varco CN-65 or GE C650 ceramic cart. At least the RP was NOT a cheap one and it worked just fine for the 45's I bought then.
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Dave

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2019, 03:27:03 PM »
I had to hardwire much of the chassis on Don's 1590 to make it work.  I'd hate to have to do that on a color TV chassis.  Do you know who built GE's tuners? 
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Motorola Minion

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #25 on: April 25, 2019, 03:33:33 PM »
I think the tuners in GE and Magnavox TVs were the cheap Standard-Kollsman. It was not even comparable to Zenith or RCA for sure.

In our locale if you were on a hill or slope to south or east or had cable - you could scarcely tell the difference between manufacturers and GE was as good as any.

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Dave

Bill

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2019, 06:27:55 PM »
Roger!

I learned something today, I that GE made component stereos.  The one you pictured looks impressive, and it would fun to see one someday.   

Bill


electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2019, 10:07:41 PM »
I have my step-dads GE stereo turntable.  It has an Astatic magnetic cartridge and is in a wooden base.  I use it to play 78's when I process records to digital.  It is very similar to the turntables used in the higher-end GE stereos only it has a magnetic cartridge to use with a component amplifier. 
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TC Chris

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2019, 11:41:31 PM »

Musaphonic was the term used for the very best GE equipment back in the 30s and 40s, like Magnavox had Imperial.



I have seen some of the big console Musaphonics.  Much later, toward the end of the tube era, they used that name for some small plastic-cased radios.  I've got a couple that are identical except for name--both are 6-tube sets (AA% with tuned RF added) but one is labelled "Long Distance" and the other "Musaphonic."  I'll need to study schematics some day to see if there were circuit differences to emphasize sensitivity vs. sound quality.  I've got my Dad's old Musaphonic clock radio, too  (maybe with silver mica disease??--lots of crackling).

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: We need to start a GE board on here!
« Reply #29 on: April 30, 2019, 08:58:20 AM »
I have a couple Musaphonic radios in plastic cases.  And a Long Distance in a cheap wooden case.  Pretty good performing radios for what they are.  SMD on a printed circuit chassis is an especially nasty PITA.  One of my Musaphonic sets has a 35GL6 output tube.  Nearly as different as the 50DC4 rectifier in one of the stereos.  Like the Zenith 6KT8 in TV sets.

I need an inline fuse for the 2060.  Sal now carries those.  He has more stuff for old radios than AES anymore.  He gives good service and has good prices, so he should do well.
I don't need Google.  My wife says she knows everything.