Author Topic: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops  (Read 477 times)

vintage cltr

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1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« on: April 22, 2019, 09:23:49 AM »
Up for sale we have a very well preserved vintage tube console. This Magnificent Magnavox is finished in the Danish Modern cabinet styling.

 It is a 1959.

 It is all original and sounds great. The turntable works, but I would suggest a cleaning.

This was the TOTL Magnavox console of the day and is still considered to be one of the best made.

We all know the CG's have climbed in value significantly within the past 2 years.

This unit is in very good cosmetic condition. No chips, scrapes, or anything. Not bad for being 60 years old

You do not find them this original anymore.

 $1500
Loud and Vintage.... any questions?

firedome

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2019, 04:43:03 PM »
Nice!
FYI: Just for reference an essentially identical one being sold by the California Historical Radio group just sold a week or so ago for $600, after being reduced in priced one or two times, in an area of high income earners... just sayin'.

https://antiqueradios.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=356830
Happy Motoring! from Roger in NY

electra225

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2019, 10:19:35 PM »
I'm wondering if the bloom is off the rose as far as Concert Grands selling for the big money is concerned.  The last couple I've heard of selling did not get asking price. 
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vintage cltr

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2019, 07:04:49 AM »
i'm not concerned if the bottom has fell out of the market, what's the down side?

if I don't sell it, i'll keep it.

i'm not bitter, so please don't read that into my response.

the market has become somewhat saturated, but I just sold my other CG for $1200, but it needed to be restored.

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electra225

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2019, 09:19:13 AM »
I wouldn't mind having a Danish to go with my other one.  I like the glass lids.  I'm not paying anywhere close to $1200 for one.  Not even half that, with transportation and restoration costs on top of that.  If $1200 is the going rate, I'll get along with what I've got.
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ukfan4sure!

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2019, 03:22:33 PM »
The problem selling these is hooking up the willing buyer with the willing console.  What I am saying is, getting the purchase to it's intended new home "logistically" can be the reason one might not sell.  For instance, I "might" be an interested party, but then "how the hell do I get it home?" becomes the first thing in my head.  I'm more than willing to do a 300 mile drive, like Louisville to Chicago, or Louisville to B'Ham, but much farther than that becomes a "maybe".  It would depend on the condition, in my book.  I've never done a road trip for something that I've been sorry for later.  The road trip is quickly forgotten after the item of beauty is home. 
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electra225

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2019, 11:59:54 PM »
I travelled 450 miles round trip to get my Imperial.  I travelled a little over 1100 miles round trip to get my Concert Grand, and I travelled a little over 1500 miles to get the Stereo Theater.  These things are huge and heavy and you need a truck or trailer and a willing co-conspirator.  These guys asking the big money for an unrestored Concert Grand do not take that into account.  I have more in transportation cost in my CG as what I paid for it.  Then you have restoration cost.  I have over $500 in hard costs in my CG and I did all the work.  I simply can't see the economics in paying $1500 for a Concert Grand, having $500 in transportation costs, then spend another (minimum) $500 to fix it.  That puts me $2500 in a 60-year old, obsolete, piece of home electronics gear with a very limited market.  And, compared with later stereo equipment, very marginal performance.  If you just have to have one and money is no object, then fine.  But many of us need to be able to look our better half in the eye and justify such an expense.  In fairness, this is a labor of love, and money is not the primary consideration.  Also in fairness, I'll have three times in my Stereo Theater than I have in all the rest of my Magnavox collection put together.  And, if I drop dead tomorrow, my wife MIGHT get $50 for it, or she might have to pay somebody to haul it off.  Even though when I get it done, it will have the lowest monetary value of anything in my collection, it will be the crowning jewel of my collection because I looked so hard to find it, I wanted one for so long, and I have put so much of myself into bringing it back from the dead.  That's what this hobby is all about.   ;) ;) :) :)

Something else I learned about big Magnavox instruments.  Wherever they are is where I ain't.  You have to be willing to travel....... ::) :-[ ;) :)

Right after I got my Concert Grand, a man in Rochester, NY offered to GIVE me a Danish Concert Grand.  I did not have time to go get it right then and I did not trust anyone to ship it to me, crated and wrapped to avoid damage, for anything resembling a reasonable price.  I had to pass.  This is one of my issues with getting too much money wrapped up in these large pieces of home entertainment gear.  Even FREE is sometimes too much to pay, considering other costs.  And, if you can't do the restoration work yourself, you are pretty much out of luck.  I once knew a man with means to pay to have his CG restored, but could find no one interested in the project.  He sold it, unrestored.  Testosterone comes into play when you mention a Concert Grand for sale.  They are not for the weak of heart.   ::)
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TC Chris

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2019, 09:53:23 AM »
In fairness, this is a labor of love, and money is not the primary consideration.  Also in fairness, I'll have three times in my Stereo Theater than I have in all the rest of my Magnavox collection put together.  And, if I drop dead tomorrow, my wife MIGHT get $50 for it, or she might have to pay somebody to haul it off.  Even though when I get it done, it will have the lowest monetary value of anything in my collection, it will be the crowning jewel of my collection because I looked so hard to find it, I wanted one for so long, and I have put so much of myself into bringing it back from the dead.  That's what this hobby is all about.   ;) ;) :) :)

You've identified the real reason for doing this.  It's recreation.  We spend lots of money on stuff that will have little or no resale value.  Look at what people pay for tickets to big sports events, just to sit & watch for a couple hours.  At the end, what's left of monetary value? Nothing....  But the participants have the memories, which are important to their lives.  I like movies and send money to see them on the big screen, leaving the memories and maybe some better understanding of the world.  Or the boats... my old boats take hours of work each year, plus storage and launching/hauling fees plus all the paints and varnishes and sealers and hardware, all with a hefty price increase because the products say "marine" on them.  The old joke is that a boat is a hole in the water into which you pour money.  It's not far from the mark.  But for those of us who love sailing for its challenges and opportunities to learn and respond to the unexpected, it's worth it.  And when somebody walks past the boat at the marina and says "wow, nice boat," those hours in the cold boat barn in early spring are rewarded.  Yesterday I got thumbs-up signs in response to the boat and the Chevy--both 1961 products.  Both worth less than the money I've spent, not considering the time I've spent.  We do these things for many reasons, but mostly not to increase our financial wealth.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2019, 04:49:50 PM »
In the auto restoration business there were two famous sayings.  "The money is made in the buy" and "first money is best money".  I would negotiate for HOURS on the price of a car needing restoration.  I just could not get in too deep in the buy.  I would set a total budget for a certain project.  Buy the car, get the parts, do the work, farm out what I could not do myself.  It all had to be done for X number of dollars.  If I paid more going in, that left less to finish the project on.  It might run me short if I ran into problems, like the entire rear seat floor in a convertible being rusted out due to brake fluid from the hydraulic system leaking and rusting everything out.  Then when it came time to sell the finished product, I typically would accept the first reasonable, serious offer.  I learned to spot posers and to recognize a serious buyer.  I do the same thing with consoles, without selling the final product. 
I don't need Google.  My wife says she knows everything.

TC Chris

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2019, 10:30:08 PM »
Today I was driving my mother around in her Subaru since the weather was stinky and it hadn't been driven in quite a while.  Part of the stinkiness was an onshore wind, blowing straight across Lake Huron from Canada.  That raises the water level out in Saginaw Bay, plus we've had lots of rain in the region, enough to cause flooding nearby.  That means lots of water coming down the river and the wind at the mouth pushing Bay water into the river upstream. I drove into a boat launch area on the Saginaw River to see how high the water was there (docks under water).  On the way in we passed the shop that replaced my Mustang's engine after it hydrolocked in an earlier flood.  In the parking area was a ca. 1951-52 Plymouth, paint all oxidized away, but looking intact.  Because of where it was, it's likely that somebody was restoring it.  I'm always tickled to see an old survivor that's getting attention.  It's probably a not-for-profit undertaking, like my Chevy, where the owner hires this fix and that one as the funds become available or his common sense abates momentarily.  I've always figured that common sense is overrated when it comes to hobbies.  Doing it for a living?  Yeah, you've got to have a budget.  Doing it for fun, or even worse for sentiment?  Throw that calculator out the window.

By the way, as to the hydrolocked Mustang, always know where your air intake is located.  All of my cars before the Mustang were carbureted and had an air cleaner snorkel above the carb.  The real water danger was getting the distributor wet.  Some Ford engineer decided to go for cold air on the Mustang and put the intake down by ankle level.  Not good in high water....

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2019, 10:54:41 PM »
My Mini was not designed to run in the rain, let alone high water.  The air intake is above the grille.  The intercooler is only four inches off the roadway.  If one drives thru standing deep water, I've been warned that it is possible for water to enter the intake system via the connections on the intercooler under certain conditions.  There is a sensor that beeps and sets a light if the intake system is compromised in some way.  The car is so light that if you run thru a water puddle, the ends may want to swap, which would not be pleasant.  So I'm careful when it rains.

I reckon old bad habits are hard to break.  I still set limits for myself, even when related to a hobby.  Carte blanche spending ruins the fun for me.  Part of that fun is getting the item as inexpensively (cheap) as I can, and then keeping my costs under control. 
I don't need Google.  My wife says she knows everything.

TC Chris

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2019, 06:16:52 PM »
Well, as a guy who gets most of his stuff for free (i.e, from junk piles at curbside or from friends who can save space in the dumpster by giving things to me), I can hardly disagree.  But my real point is that usually spending on our hobby interests doesn't make economic sense until you add in the recreational/mental health benefits. Boat ownership is the classic example.  No person in their right mind would own a boat as a profit-making undertaking (oh, a few do buy storm-damaged and insurance write-off boats to flip, but not many).  It's almost purely an opportunity to spend money.  Others choose golf, an expensive activity which I regard as a silly eccentricity.  Golf fans probably think that anybody who goes sailing and gets wet and cold for fun is crazy.  But we both pay good money for something that we find personally rewarding. 

As with my electronics, I do almost all my boat maintenance and repair myself.  It's part of the challenge and part of the fun.  I get a bit snobbish about lazy rich people who hire out all the work.  And it keeps the costs down.  For those costs I can't control, I grin and bear it. 

Chris Campbell

vintage cltr

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2019, 10:43:51 AM »
well, it sold to a guy in North Carolina
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chazglenn3

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Re: 1959 Magnavox Concert Grand - rare wood tops
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2019, 12:54:01 PM »
Congrats! From this forum ad or from another?
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