Author Topic: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?  (Read 646 times)

TC Chris

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Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« on: May 09, 2019, 07:13:56 PM »
I was out in the garage getting the boat's mooring ball out--spring may show up eventually--and I had to move a couple car radio/cassette players a neighbor had given me.  One is a Sony EXR 14 and the other a Toyota branded Fujitsu Ten with a "I'm not quite sure" model no.  I've also got an old Delco AM-FM radio.  For each one, the big challenge is the pin-out diagram, which lead is what.  You've got power in, lighting power in, maybe a clock or memory power in, antenna power leads, and then all the speaker outs.  Quite the mess to figure out without a diagram.  Any suggestions on a good source of info?

The Fujitsu Ten looks interesting--it has AM stereo.

Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 01:03:55 PM »
Do you have the pigtail wiring for these, or is it just the jack on the back of the radio?

Sony should be standard car stereo color codes if you have the wires. The age will make a difference to the factory radio pinouts.

Fujistsu was pretty good about labeling the PCB connections, take the bottom off and you'll probably find enough to get you going. I doubt you'll have such luck with the Delco, but it should be easy unless it's something newer & designed to work with the CAN bus.

Both of the factory units will use BTL amps inside, don't assume any speaker negatives to be common.

The Delco will be the best sounding of the 3. Upload some pics, and I'll help you out. I spent more than a decade of youth in that world.
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2019, 05:45:23 PM »
The Sony has the pigtail and the others don't.  I did take the old Delco apart some time back and try to figure out where the jack contacts were connected.  It's elderly and mono.  It still had me buffaloed.  On the boat I have an old cassette receiver that I found in a ditch while biking once.  It's basic and I figured that one out--power in and speaker outs so I used a standard trailer light connector on it. 

Next week I'll snap some photos.

Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2019, 04:17:59 PM »
Here's a late 80's Fujitsu Ten from a Camry. I should still have pin designations for many factory wiring plugs from the 70's-90's
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2019, 08:01:46 PM »
I'll post photos.  My Fujitsu Ten is a Toyota "PLL Synthesized AM/FM Receiver 1636."   On top it says 6102-14691 (label damaged; ma be another first digit before the 6).  It has AM stereo and a wicked amount of heat sinking.  The output plug (jack?) looks like the one in your photo. 

The Sony is an EXR-14, "SSIR PLL Synthesizer Tuner."  It has pigtails.

Last, the Delco, a mono device with pigtails.  I'll post front and back images.


Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2019, 10:55:48 PM »
On the Delco, black is and, yellow is +12V, gray is dash lights (+V, up t.o 12v) and pink is pwr antenna. Greens are speaker wires, and the one on the locking tab side is positive.

Sony is 80's,  and the Fujitsu looks like it probably from a Supra, late 80's. I might have a pigtail for it around here.

To be continued...
-Tim

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2019, 11:51:37 PM »
That should read "black is ground".

Back in my car stereo days, I saw quite a few diy installs that would blow a fuse or shut off when they turned the headlights on. The dash light wire on those old cars can read low enough resistance to make you think it's a ground.

Standard car audio colors are black for gnd, red for +12V switched, yellow for +12V battery (memory for presents and clock), and blue for pwr antenna/amp remote on. Speaker wires are pairs of gray, white, green and purple with black stripes on the negatives. This standard wasnt quite in place when the Sony was made, but they were one of the first to use it. Memory wire could be orange, and speaker wires may be different, but most likely still in like-colored pairs with striped negatives.
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2019, 12:04:10 AM »
How much current draw is there for memory and clock functions?  One of these might land in my sailboat, but it relies on a small solar device to keep the battery up.  It's a "house battery" for lights, instruments, and radio only.  If I use it for lights at night, I'll hook up a charger but otherwise the small solar charger does it all.  I don't want to add a constant current drain.  But likely the clock and memory are very tiny draws?

Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2019, 12:51:57 AM »
Memory/back-up is indeed negligible current draw. You can always connect it to a switched source and not use the clock or station presets. You could also add a toggle switch and turn it off if the boat won't be used for a couple weeks.
-Tim

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2019, 11:47:49 AM »
 Chris, the Delco is an 80's model, too. The nosepiece / tuning indicator is a holdover from the 8-track flip-up style indicator. That, along with the mechanical station presets would normally say late 70's to me, but I don't recall anything pre 80's that used the big plastic mounting trimplate on yours. Shaft mount units were always mounted directly to the dash before that. I can almost place the car that used that mount, but it keeps escaping me.

 If you notice, the 3 standard Delco jacks are in place on that unit, although you only have two plugs. On a stereo unit, the 4 speaker wire pairs are in the same orientation as the green wires on yours -vertical pairs, with the wire on the locking-tab side as positive. I don't recall a single common-grounded Delco, so no grounding speaker negatives or sharing them between channels. Since you have the extra jacks, that unit may be stereo with a mono speaker plug for the specific car. The easy way to tell is to take the top off and see if the extra positions are wired. If the wires are there, and there are no missing power IC's on the PCB, you have stereo. Either solder the wires in place, or I may have a set of those plugs, too.

 I'll dig around for the Toyota plug today or tomorrow. I think I may still have the pin diagram I drew out for Toyota many years ago. If not, I'll trace my open unit in the pic and draw it out so you don't have to open yours up.
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2019, 09:51:42 PM »
Your info is very helpful.  I'm betting that the Delco is mono--there's no balance control or other stereo controls.  The poor thing sat in an abandoned boat, mostly shielded from the weather.  That Fujitsu Ten is the mystery box, what with its AM stereo option, the huge heat sink casting, and the (apparently) graphic tone-control readout.  And the Sony is probably just quietly competent, if perhaps promising a bit over-much in the power department (the front panel says "22W x 4; 6W x 2" or maybe the reverse--22W x 2, which would make more sense).

Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2019, 12:48:30 AM »
You're right about mono if there are no balance controls- I was fooled by the grip on the back of the tuning knob.

The mystique of the Fujitsu is typical 1980's Japanese show of maximum lights and buttons. The Supra was their US flagship, and in '87 or so they went to a larger body that no longer looked like the Celica. This body was used until the '93 model came along with its outrageous rear spoiler and 180mph twin-turbo option. Where the previous early 80's Supra had a double DIN stereo, I'm remembering it as bit clunkier with a graphic equalizer with sliders. The big, fancy, '87 Supra was far more luxurious and got something new for the stereo, with large more graphic displays and a totally different look. And that's what you have. The Cressida was their 4-door luxury car, and may have used this unit as well, but those didn't come in for stereo upgrades. Youthful Celicas and Supras were common in the stereo shops and I enjoyed working on them. About 1/4 of the phillips head bolts they mounted these to the dash with stripped, but fortunately they were also hex head (Nissan wasn't so thoughtful).

Setting trips down memory lane aside, this unit is pretty standard in operation. The big buttons for cassette and radio are soft-touch logic control, and Toyota likes to tell you that. APS is Automatic Program Search to advance to the next track, Skip will go past the next track, RPT will rewind and repeat a track. I like that the rewind and fast-forward buttons don't change with tape direction. Tone controls are standard pots with center detents, and if I recall correctly, the "ACOUSTIC" button is a preset equalization curve. It may toggle through more than one setting. The large 3-piece display shows direction of tape play... Here's where it's really testing me... I think the Auto Tape Selector selects and displays tape bias, The R/L display is a bar graph type VU meter, and the EQ curve is displayed below that. The most power you can get at ~12V and 4Ω is about 14W. I know there's not a switch mode DC-DC converter boosting supply voltage in there, so it's going to be about 14W x 4.

Most of the time, someone who had enough expendable income to buy one if these cars and bring it to me would have been swapping this out for one of the fancy new CD players. Seems like I did a few installs where I added a CD changer to the existing system or maybe a cell phone or alarm system installation.
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2019, 10:04:20 AM »
I am laughing about the proliferation of functions.  It kept exploding until it reached the Pioneer CD radio that I put in my Mustang when the original cassette deck and its tuner started dying.  The Pioneer has more functions and a less helpful user guide (available online only, of course, not in hard paper with the unit) than anything I've ever seen. And it has a massively stupid start-up mode that remains on--draining the car battery even when the ignition is off--until you disable it.  And disabling it requires a PhD in bad instructions.  There are something like 1500 color combinations for the display, plus various moving-crawling displays.  And setting the bass, treble, balance, front-rear, and EQ add their own complexities.  Now, eventually I figure these out, and the unit works just fine until the next time the battery is disconnected and I have to crawl up that learning curve all over again.  It has reminded me of the considerable virtues of devices that have real knobs.  Oh, and knobs--what idiot designed a car unit that requires touching tiny buttons, in a moving vehicle, with dire consequences when the car bounces a bit and your finger finds the wrong button, the one that changes the color instead of the station.... AAArrghh!!!!

Chris Campbell

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2019, 12:33:56 AM »
disabling it requires a PhD in bad instructions.  AAArrghh!!!!


LOL!

A hundred pages of instructions, and mounting depth is nowhere in them.  ???  That's what I found. I guess nowadays, it's more important to know how to match the backlight color to your girlfriends' mood than to know if it will actually fit in your car.

Demo/advertising mode, cryptic menu-driven adjustments, menus and more menus.  My Pioneer requires me to agree to a disclaimer every single time I turn the car on before it will do anything. When I finally yank it out, I'll probably tear it to pieces and dance on the bones! At least that's what I tell it about once a week.

It has reminded me of the considerable virtues of devices that have real knobs.

Yeah, try to find that in a car stereo now. That's exactly where I'm at. My Pioneer is made specifically to work with the iPhone 4, nothing else. The iPhone 4 finally bit the dust, so I've been looking for a replacement for a couple months. Ugh.
I want knobs, and the volume control should be analog. A potentiometer that acts instantly, not a rotary encoder.

I've even considered just building a preamp/head unit to get those knobs, with inputs for a CD and phone. That's why I have this Fujitsu unit disassembled in the picture I posted, to measure for a homemade PCB to see what I can squeeze in there. But we have a new cell phone law, and I need handsfree phone operation. That's best done with a bluetooth head unit with a display, answering function, etc. Ugh, again. Maybe I can find a way to integrate it.

Please tell me I don't have to face 1500 color combinations and crawling displays!!!

Oh, to be on topic- I did locate two Toyota plugs that I think are correct for yours. I'll post a pic of them tomorrow with a measuring device, so you can verify the measurements. Older units use larger plugs than these, and newer units have smaller ones.

-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #14 on: May 29, 2019, 06:26:21 PM »
Damn--"demo mode," that's the name for the devil's own invention that Pioneer defaults into, the one that drains your car battery without telling you it's on, the one you don't even learn about unless you print out the whole set of online instructions and read each page until you find the disclaimer, "oh, by the way, unless you get it out of demo mode, it will drain your battery."  Of course, the instructions for getting out of demo mode are elsewhere and equally well hidden (not to mention hard to figure out).  Then there's the half-a-gazillion display feature--crawlies, colors, flashes, and it's what happens when you try to hit a button while driving and the car jiggles just as your finger gets near the button and bumps into the wrong one instead.  Obviously the person who designed the unit never had to use it in a car.  It probably made great sense on the bench.

Chris Campbell
Getting PTSD from his car stereo