Author Topic: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?  (Read 410 times)

Alfista

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2019, 08:43:31 AM »
Sorry for the long delay, Chris.

The designers should be forced to live with one of their creations until it has been discontinued. And a manual written in a language they don't speak. I think they were just thinking of what they look like in the showroom, definitely marketed to a lesser age group.

PTSD ain't far from the truth! Mine finally refuses to talk to my old iPhone. >:( So I refused to talk to it anymore. No more pleading, no more threats. I just ignore it and set my phone on speaker and turn it up as loud as it will go. Maybe one day it will get jealous enough to start working again.

I've got tons of old car stereo equipment, but no good working CD players that I remember. Maybe I'll dig out some cassettes and the Nakamichi TD700...

Here are pics of the Toyota plugs that I have, plugged into the jack in my previous pic. Rule for measurement, compare it to yours.

The twisted Gray & Blue are the +12V leads. Gray is for memory, blue is switched. Brown is ground.

The other twisted pairs are speakers, the small plug is the rear speakers. Be consistent with +/- on the same side of the plug, seems like red and black are +. All BTL, if I remember correctly, so don't use any common speaker leads.

The remaining wires are a unique Toyota thing:
2 power antenna leads = pink/blue AND black/red. I think one is up and one is down, we had to tie them together in the harness when installing and aftermarket head unit.
The last two are getting into fuzzy memory, one is obviously lighting connected to the dimmer. I think the other is either a dash light ground or a dash light constant voltage.

If you would like me to send these plugs to you, just PM me an address.
-Tim

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2019, 06:55:17 PM »
That's more helpful info.  No need to apologize for delays... I approach things in the "when I can get around to it" manner too.  Like checking my unit's jack configuration and dimensions.  I'l grab it when I wander out to pick asparagus from the patch for dinner.  It is asparagus season in Michigan.

Chris Campbell

TC Chris

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #17 on: June 10, 2019, 07:29:58 PM »
I grabbed the F. Ten Toyota unit and took it outside to photograph in natural light, on the white boa cover.  The robins that are nesting under my garage eaves made a fuss so I walked around to the front of the house in the sunlight.  The larger connector has 6 contacts in the top row and 4 in the bottom.  The smaller one has 4 and 2.  I tried to get the dimensions in too.  Let's see how it turned out.

The photos are acceptable but I wish they'd put the inch scale on top.  The larger connector is about 1" inside and the smaller one is 11/16".

Chris Campbell

Alfista

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2019, 12:18:25 AM »
Do you keep your asparagus contained? We don't have anything planted this year, I wasn't able to expend much physical effort due to gut surgeries. I'd love an asparagus patch, doesn't it take a while to get it productive?

Our connectors are a match, 1
-Tim

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Re: Pin-out diagrams for car stereos?
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2019, 12:23:47 AM »
I bought my house 25 years ago.  The next spring the county was selling compost containers and when you bought one they threw in a batch of asparagus roots.  As I was walking back to the truck another buyer hollered, "Hey, want some more roots?  I've got enough at home."  So I doubled my take.  They do require a couple years to get going. Mine began getting sparse so i bought more from Burpee a few years ago, just before the neighbor's fence crew trampled all over them.  They're a low-effort crop.  Plant, wait, pick, with a bit of weeding thrown in.

Chris Campbell