Author Topic: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294  (Read 1257 times)

TC Chris

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #15 on: October 24, 2019, 12:13:04 AM »
What a great story!  Interesting that the Brits, whose cars were out-quirked only by the French, would use an American engine and transmission instead of making their own from scratch. 

And as to an obsession with appearance, even where it can't be seen, I am reminded of my Sonora console acoustic phonograph.  We removed the spring-drive motor to move the beast in the early 1970s.  Inside, where nobody would ever see it, was this beautiful polished European mechanism, gleaming bright.  I figured it was polished and lacquered brass.  While trying to find a photo of the exact device for a post here a while ago I ran across an internet statement that the motor was gold-plated.  Maybe so... it had remained bright for 50-odd years by the time we opened it up.  But either way, polished and lacquered or gold plated, it's a bit of overkill.

Chris Campbell

electra225

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #16 on: October 24, 2019, 07:04:56 PM »
When I had my restoration shop, we had a super-picky customer who spent over $300,000 doing a restoration on a '54 Buick Skylark.  He spent what I considered to be "silly" money.  He had the seat frames powder coated.  He had the window regulator mechanisms cad plated.  He had the inside of the engine block coated with the stuff they use in racing engines.  He ordered a full stainless steel exhaust system, add date coded.  He special ordered a L-O-F windshield.  He had the carburetor cad plated.  And he had me take the radio completely apart and cad plate the metal case on the radio.  And take all the components off the metal radio chassis and had it cad plated.  He got aggravated at me because I would not polish the bakelite on the 12V6 output tubes.  Had I polished the tubes like he wanted, it would have erased the "Delco" and the date codes.  He had me hunt thru my tube stash to come up with correct date-coded tubes.  I typically used red model car paint to repaint the pointer in the radio dial.  Not for this guy.  He had me take the pointer out of the radio and take it to a body shop for proper painting.  I never told him the RR transmission story.  It would have fallen on deaf ears.  The guy liked spending money.   


My grandfather told me the RR story.  In the late 1980's, Menno Duerksen of Cars and Parts magazine was doing a story on Hydra-Matic and told the story again.  He included certain details my grandfather omitted.  Grandpa always bragged that the British may make high toney cars, but they had a Packard engine and an Oldsmobile transmission.  I wondered if they converted the Packard engine and Oldsmobile transmission to Whitworth fasteners.  By the  time I started working on Rolls, everything had metric fasteners.  GM had gone to metric fasteners by this time, too.


Rolls Royce did not make quirky cars.  They were built like a truck, literally.  They had the biggest driveshaft I ever saw in a car.  The brakes were huge.  The oil filter for a Rolls cost almost $100 from the dealer.  It was the same filter as a 392 Chrysler Hemi that you could buy from the parts store for $5.  The brake pads cost almost $400 an axle from the dealer.  You could buy two sets of Datsun 240Z brake pads per axle for about $15 a set from the parts store.  They had six ply tires from the factory.  You could run a Rolls on rail road ties and never feel a bump.  Just don't add brake fluid to the mineral oil brake system.  That made a big mess.  Most Rolls weighed more than 7000 pounds.  The long wheelbase models weighed more than that.  They were wonderful, totally silent cars.
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TC Chris

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #17 on: October 24, 2019, 08:23:32 PM »

Rolls Royce did not make quirky cars. 

Well the car as you describe it is a bit quirky in terms of its perfectionism.  But I was really thinking about cars like the Morgan, which I think you can still buy, or anything with those failure-prone English electrical systems.  I once saw an explanation.  It was that the English expected their cars to need attention and expected to be able to spend a bit of time in the driveway on a Saturday, adjusting the carburetor or  repairing something.  They didn't want cars that didn't involve them.

Chris Campbell

ed from Baltimore

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #18 on: October 24, 2019, 10:43:00 PM »
           A few months ago I saw a dark green mid '70s Rolls Royce 4 door sedan parked outside a breakfast diner and took a good look at it for ten minutes or so.  The car actually looked a bit on the small side. Very squared off lines, almost plain. The wheels and tires looked oversized as if there was barely room for them in the fenders.  The paint looked perfectly new but you could tell it was the original. The fit of the doors and door  frames was so perfect that even a casual glance made it obvious. All the lines were sharp  edged. I guess the bumpers were rated at 5 MPH like all the 1974 and later cars sold in America, but nothing looked added on.
          I'm not saying it right, but the entire car exuded a kind of quality that made it seem as superior to an average car of that era as a Lincoln would be to a Ford Pinto. I would have loved to have seen under the hood or the undercarriage.
        I used to have some large picture books of Allied WWII engines, and the Merlin (and all the other makes of V12s too) engine was a real eye-popper with all those tiny bolts on the valve covers. I'll bet they didn't even need gaskets to prevent oil leaks. All the  rotary air cooled engines looked a little sloppy by comparison although I have read that they were just as powerful and reliable.

Ken Doyle

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #19 on: October 25, 2019, 02:45:58 PM »
As you said, Packard built some Rolls Royce Merlin aircraft engines for the war effort, but as far as I know the post-WWII Rolls Royce automobile V8 engine is no relation to the 1955 Packard V8.  The Packard V8 was a fine engine, but it was only produced for 2 model years, as the 1957 "Packardbakers" were powered by Studebaker engines.

electra225

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #20 on: October 25, 2019, 07:19:58 PM »
"as far as I know"........ ::)


Other than something you can disagree with me on, I'm not sure it matters.  For the record, Menno Duerksen of "Cars and Parts" magazine wrote an article in 1987 or '88 that mentioned this very fact.  I've often wondered if Studebaker-Packard may have sold the old Packard V-8 to Rolls to finance the new Lark models introduced in 1959.  Where did SP suddenly come up with money to retool for the Lark when they were barely above water?  And, when Packard bought Studebaker, why did Studebaker survive and let[size=78%] Packard die after 1958?[/size]
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Ken Doyle

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #21 on: October 26, 2019, 08:43:22 AM »
The basic body shell of the Lark is the same one that goes back to the 1953 model.  The new 1955 Packard was an awesome car, but it had quality control problems which severely hurt Packard's reputation, and they could barely give them away.  Studebaker-Packard Corporation didn't drop the Packard name until 1962.  When Studebaker stopped building cars in 1966 they did not go out of business, they simply left the automotive field.  They exist today as part of Federal-Mogul Corporation. 

electra225

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #22 on: October 26, 2019, 12:52:43 PM »
I would like to apologize to Boyce for seriously hijacking his Magnavox thread.  I offered one of my favorite stories about the pursuit of perfection.  This good-faith effort deteriorated into an attack by the correct police.  It's time to get back to working on Magnavox stereos.  I'm sorry this topic got so far off the rails.   
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Ken Doyle

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #23 on: October 26, 2019, 03:57:07 PM »

Certainly didn't mean to assist in hijacking the thread.  I ask the OP to please accept my apology.


No police here, just someone who heard a different story.  Isn't that one of the purposes of a forum, to toss things around?

Boyce

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Re: Recapping Magnavox 2ST294
« Reply #24 on: November 05, 2019, 10:00:42 AM »
You guys just share all the stories that you care to share - I'm lovin' every minute of it!!! Have I told you lately that this Group is Great?