: General Electric solid state 1967  ( 259 )

Motorola Minion

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General Electric solid state 1967
« : April 12, 2021, 08:56:57 PM »
Unfortunately not able to post pictures but I can appreciate this radio not because it was a wedding present to my in-laws but the very odd composition of it.
I first saw it in the garage back in 1996 or so. It was dirty and so was the cord, stiff and suspect with nicks and mice-nibbles along the way. One day while installing some industrial grade fluorescent lights in a 16 foot row.

I figured since I was rewiring things anyway and needed an audible test for killing a circuit from the basement fusebox, I would plug it in and of course it crackled as the volume was turned on and slowly increased but it picked up the right stations on FM, below 92 Mc of course. I left it on that day and over the years used it briefly when doing various tasks and gardening prep.

Recently my father in law handed it to me and said here, add it to your collection so how could I say no. The first thing I noticed was a faded label that was illegible. Then saw the small wooden set had "cabinet made in Colombia". That was just the beginning of it.
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Dave

Bill

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #1 : April 13, 2021, 07:56:22 AM »
What's the model Dave?  We could then Google it and see you new toy.

Bill


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General Electric solid state T-2260 H
« #2 : April 13, 2021, 11:38:05 AM »
This one https://radioatticarchives.com/radio.htm?radio=12969 which is a very standard looking design for "good enough" GE.

The inside is what I was not ready for :o, what looked like a combination of components from various manufacturers both Foreign and Domestic.

I cant post any pictures so a description will have to do. First there were two yellow-metal 4" speakers fed by what looks like a junior sized power transistor in a TO-66 package.

There was an external speaker jack so that output explains how that's even possible with an otherwise small radio chassis.
Good thing I saved a small extension speaker, now I can use that too. I worked on a Magnavox table radio from the same year and it had that same TO-66 transistor, that needed replacement. It also had an external speaker jack. Sorry the pics are gone but it was this one. http://vintagehifi.net/index.php/topic,1401.0.html

The odd part of the GE is, the circuit board for audio amp and the radio were separate circuit boards slid into the same plastic frame and appeared inverted ???, the amp side had volume-power switch and with heat sink and output transistor, seemed to be from possibly GE BUT a radio side that is very obviously Japanese with tiny little IF cans and a sealed cube tuner. Cleaning the volume control and band switch did not bring AM in, neither did cleaning the foil side of both circuit boards which had 50 years of dust

A set of antenna screw terminals on the PC board had wires to extend them down to another set of terminals on the plastic frame where a hole in the wood allows access. Just a pair of 32 inch lamp cord was all I needed to get the desired stations.

I ran it this morning and AM is still dead even after I washed all that dirt out. Antenna ferrite is connected, so it must be a bad transistor.

It appeared that a plastic table radio had a wood cabinet built and wrapped around it, complete with a typical Masonite back cover the plastic parts were not deep enough for the chassis. Then, only 2 voltage dropping resistors and no transformers. The first time I plugged it in, I smelled those resistors heating up ::) If this was built (as I suspect) in GE's "radio receiver department" in Utica, NY - they were seeing the writing on the wall while building all that crazy stuff. :(

My brother and I both got US-made GE clock AM radios for Christmas in 1970, which were both labeled as being from that same "radio receiver department". Of course I still have it and that same red-inked white label is also faded beyond legibility.

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Dave

TC Chris

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #3 : April 13, 2021, 09:46:21 PM »
Thanks for the RadioAttic link. I've been trying to find the model no. for a 1960s GE clock radio with the famous faded label, and now it's known--C-1580Z.  I tried to fix the hum by replacing filter caps but it kept humming. Seems to me the radio uses the clock motor winding as a power supply choke and I must have reconnected it backwards or something.  A schematic would be so nice.  What's the source for GE transistor-era schematics?  A Google search produced nothing.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #4 : April 14, 2021, 08:19:40 AM »
Thanks Dave!   It's interesting how GE did things.  I just finished working on a GE portable stereo. It was just a control cleaning, new needle, and a little changer service.  It has the GE Trimline metal case, but the guts are like the GE plastic case "Wildcat". It sounds OK for what it is, and it really surprises me that it has more bass than my Motorola 50 pound portable with 6BQ5's.  The speakers in the GE are cheap, cheap, the changer is GE built and it has a GE cartridge.  The thing that is really interesting, everything plugs in.  It was awesome to service.  I did not need to unsolder anything, just unplug it.  Why would a company that cut costs in everything spend the money on all the plugs??  Anyway, I have a GE table radio in a wood case too.  Mine is tube, and I gave ten bucks for it.  It plays great, sounds good, and pulls in lots of stations on FM.  I never tried AM as in my neck of the woods AM reception is very poor.  Someday, maybe between all of us, we will have answers to all of our questions. 

Bill

TC Chris

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Re: General Electric solid state 1967
« #5 : April 14, 2021, 09:15:04 PM »
I have the real thing, a genuine plastic-case Wildcat, none of these metal-case pretenders, and it doesn't threaten anybody with bass.  It sounds kinda like that cat with its tail caught in the door, and all the bass that implies.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #6 : April 15, 2021, 08:09:30 AM »
Chris, it sounds like my "Wildcat/Trimline" has more bass than your real "Wildcat".  I can actually hear bass coming out of the one I have.  It actually belongs to one of the local antique stores here in town.  I do light stuff for them once in a while and he is good to me when he has something I'm interested in.  What color is your "Wildcat"?

Bill

TC Chris

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #7 : April 15, 2021, 07:11:55 PM »
Black.  Maybe it's a black hole, with gravity so powerful that no bass can escape.  Or maybe tiny cheap speakers are the problem.

Chris Campbell

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Re: General Electric solid state 1967
« #8 : April 27, 2021, 11:44:17 AM »
My first record player was a GE "swingmate" or something. About 1973, it was a white clamshell case that played all record sizes using the GE-made (modified Glaser-Steers?) changer, the best part. The cart was the CN-65 Varco, otherwise labeled as GE. There was a 3"x5" oval speaker that anything known as "bass" was out of range for.

As I wanted more sound out of it, toasted the amp when trying different speakers on it, so I ordered a new one somehow. It was easy because the entire PC board with volume control, etc. came along with. It plugged in and my experience with GE taught me they want to sell parts making it easy to actually fix stuff. 

Funny thing about that player but my cousin had a GE "see and play" little projector thing looked like a TV with a player on top. It actually sounded better when I played my 45s on it ::)
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Dave

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #9 : April 27, 2021, 11:48:23 AM »
Thanks for the RadioAttic link. I've been trying to find the model no. for a 1960s GE clock radio with the famous faded label, and now it's known--C-1580Z.  I tried to fix the hum by replacing filter caps but it kept humming. Seems to me the radio uses the clock motor winding as a power supply choke and I must have reconnected it backwards or something.  A schematic would be so nice.  What's the source for GE transistor-era schematics?  A Google search produced nothing.

Chris Campbell

Maybe its in Sams, which I probably have. I have a few odd GE schematics on their "audio products"
Bet there is a dropping resistor and no transformer. Lemme see.
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Dave

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Re: General Electric solid state 1967
« #10 : April 28, 2021, 07:39:12 AM »
Chris, I found the GE C-1580 in Sams 973-6. The power supply is pretty strange and I know I could not have figured it out by winging it like usual.

I can send you a picture of the schematic part, you will need it to figure that out. I may need your email though.
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Dave

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General Electric solid state 1967
« #11 : April 28, 2021, 09:08:44 PM »
Seems to me we used to have a PM option but my e-mail is no secret anyway:  ccampbell1873@charter.net.  I'd be grateful for the mystery power supply schematic. As I said, I think based on somebody else's advice that the clock motor winding was used as a filter choke,something that I didn't know when replacing the caps long ago.

Chris Campbell