: Chevy update  ( 242 )

TC Chris

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Chevy update
« : April 17, 2021, 07:32:33 PM »
Wandering off-topic again....  I visited the Chevy today and started it up.  It hadn't run since the beginning of Jan.  Three and a half months of sitting and gas evaporating out of the carburetor, and it started on the second short crank.  One to fill the barb bowls, then one to start.  Somehow I managed to get the carb all dialed in just right (pure luck).  We drove a big loop of about 12 miles or so with no complaints at all.  Maybe it helped that I dosed the gas up with some no-ethanol premium before the winter.  There are no gas stations here where they sell no-eth. gas, so I have to drag it from where I live in gas cans. 

The car is 60 years old.  When I graduated from high school, a 60-year old car would have been a 1905 model.  The Chevy is much more like a modern car than a 1905 model would have been then.

Chris Campbell

danrclem

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« #1 : April 18, 2021, 08:19:03 AM »
Glad to hear that it fired right up and you got to drive it on a nice trip.  It sounds good to hear them fire up after a hiatus.

My 69 Cougar hadn't been started up for a few years so last weekend my son and I drained the gas and blew the lines out.  I turned it over several revolutions but the gas hadn't reached the carb yet so I put some directly in the carb.  She came to life right away and then died from the lack of gas.  I put some more in the carb and she was purring like a kitten.

I didn't drive it because I don't have insurance on it yet but there's a big cruise coming up this coming Friday and I sure would like to take it.  If I don't have insurance by then I still might put it on a trailer and haul it there.

My son, grandson and I went to a cruise yesterday evening just to look around.  There were lots of nice old cars but there were lots of newer cars there also.  I don't have anything against the newer cars but I can go to any showroom floor and see those so I prefer to see the older ones.  It was cool so I hope it warms up next weekend. 

Happy trails.

Bill

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« #2 : April 18, 2021, 08:58:53 AM »
It's good to hear the word "Cruise" again.  Here in Michigan were are a little ways away before that happens.  Although, I have noticed a few classics running around a nice sunny days.  :)   Chris falls into that category, I'm glad you went for your ride Chris as it makes me have hope that spring is still here and summer just around the corner.  Keep on cruising!

Bill

PS....Danny, if I might ask what state do you live in?

danrclem

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« #3 : April 19, 2021, 09:59:20 AM »
Hi Bill, I live just south of Louisville, Ky.  We've had some really nice days here but the last few have been cool.  The older I get the more the colder weather affects me.  I might have to move out to Arizona and be Greg's neighbor.   ;D 

Unfortunately my son told me that the Friday night cruise has been cancelled but I don't know the reason.  I'm sure there are others though.  I think I'll search and see if I can find a local listing for cruises.   

Bill

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« #4 : April 19, 2021, 10:41:21 AM »
Now that you told me where you live I seem to remember you talking about living in Kentucky on the forum some time ago.  I fully understand when you say the cold bothers you.  I'm in the same boat, and not going to AZ this year was a bummer.  I am hoping that next year things will be a little less Covid, and I will feel better about traveling.  One of the places I stay in AZ is Queen Creek, and the house I stay at is about 10 minutes from Greg.  We get together for breakfast once in a while or meet up at car shows.  Thanks Danny, and I hope you find lots of car shows and cruises to go to 

Bill

TC Chris

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« #5 : April 19, 2021, 07:17:31 PM »
Chris is rolling his eyes at you guys.  Up here in northern lower Michigan, we are unhappy that the winters aren't cold enough any more.  Feb. was so mild and dry that I actually had the Mustang out for a drive. 

I've just set a new personal record: I rode the bike to work every day for the past year.  I cover 5 counties and that requires driving from time to time in normal times, but during the last year we've had no in-person work, just via Zoom.  Let's confess here that the mild winter was welcomed for bike commuting.  Heavy snows mean that my bike lanes get covered, first in snow and then by the brown mush from the cars, at least until the plows get around to clearing thoroughly.  When that happens I just move over into the car lane.  There was less of it this year.  So little, in fact, that I made a YouTube video on riding to work on Jan. 14, on clear roads.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hp_CYxguQhw&t=103s

I made a similar one on March 20, 2013, in much different conditions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALXdP9OAwWw&t=158s

Chris Campbell

Bill

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« #6 : April 20, 2021, 07:47:15 AM »
That is interesting Chris, here in Hart we had lots of snow in February and it was bitterly cold.  Even thought March was exceptional this year for sun it was still very cold.  I had snow in my yard into the third week of March.  I always fascinates me now the weather can be so different along the west coast of Michigan.  It's like there are mini pocket climates.  When I lived in Allendale, it was in the country and I was just 5 miles from Coopersville and the 96 freeway, I could go from it not snowing where I lived to a blizzard in just that 5 miles.  And, that happened a lot.  I guess good ole' Lake Michigan plays a big part on the mini pocket climates. 

Bill

Motorola Minion

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« #7 : April 20, 2021, 03:07:49 PM »
Chris, Indeed good to hear the 283 "mouse" motor is not balking at running like about 2 years ago, I remember you describing what sounded like a timing jump causing it not to start. A Pontiac guy now, I'm experienced with those as they don't require oil pan removal, so I have done a few replacements for my self and friends over the years.

So too that Cougar Dan, it reminds me of my long gone 68 Mustang. Before I switched over to Ford (twice, and the second was a new Ranger 4x4)
I fondly recall helping a friend get a replacement car after the '70 Maverick he totaled and was ejected from, left him in a coma for days and required reattachment of his hand. He knew lots of girls and was fun to hang with so helping him get back on the road was a fun weekend hobby while I was starting Electronic post-HS education.

A 1966 Ford "custom" not quite galaxie his brother had parked up in the woods, 3 years before with a near perfect black interior and decent red exterior once washed with almost no visible rust.

The replacement for that damned Maverick seemed an upgrade, which always had issues affecting handling because steering wobbled bad, making most of us afraid to ride with him. The red Ford was just waiting to be started again. With lively 289 revving right up then having its Autolite 2100 spouting gas like a fountain, I learned how responsive it was to TLC. A water pump and carb kit later, we were rolling out for a test drive and even the heat and radio worked!

At one point on this late winter night drive we hit a drainage swale up in an open alfalfa field up on the hilltop behind his house, then it stalled when it ran out of gas. Imagine our surprise when we first could not open the doors, then found the gas tank back at the swale we jumped, explaining the stall. The we got an idea the 4-door hardtop's frame "folded a bit" jamming all 4 doors forcing us to jump out a window.  We found the entire frame above rear wheels, the part which held gas tank above the axle, was gone. It was only about that time his much-older brother recalled why that "otherwise cream-puff" Ford was parked.

That was 40 years ago, my friend has passed away partly from lasting effects of the coma. But the memory of finding out why an otherwise great car was parked in the woods with an expired inspection of 3 years prior will be with me forever.

We all have stories and they sound like tall tales to others NOW, but not much was recorded then, most fortunately!
Tubes - Magical - Tubes

Dave

TC Chris

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« #8 : April 20, 2021, 08:12:14 PM »
Post-rebuild, my Chevy's problems have been (1) generator failed (rebuilt); (2) gas tank filled with mud (replaced), and (3) fuel pump died (replaced).  Oh yeah, and the first transmission "rebuild" failed completely and now it has been competently redone.  So (knock on wood) there's almost nothing left to go wrong.  Running like new now.

Great stories about youthful exuberance....  It has always been my theory that "young and stupid" is redundant.  How do any of us, at least of the male gender, survive the teen years?  Sounds like your friend came close to not surviving.  I had a '62 Corvair in 1970, a well-used vehicle that never let me down and never Nadered me.  I flogged the poor thing mercilessly and it just kept running.  Modern cars are so much safer in every way, yet young people still find creative ways to maim and kill themselves.

Chris Campbell

danrclem

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« #9 : April 20, 2021, 08:40:37 PM »
I think most of us guys have some tales to tell and you're right Chris about how it's a wonder that we survived those years.  It also revives memories of our old friends that we used to hang out with.  If my kids or grandkids did the things that I did and I found out about it I'd be all over them.

I had a 67 Mustang GTA and I tried to outrun a cop in it.  Needless to say but I didn't get away and I had to sell my car to pay the price for what I had done.  I sure would like to have that car again.

firedome

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« #10 : May 03, 2021, 01:23:35 PM »
We all did the "young & stupid" thing, and were lucky to live to tell the tale.

My dumbest thing was major drunk driving, only once, on my '71 Suzuki T-350. At age 21 I lived in a small country town in MD and went to a field party at my friend "Chopper Charlie"s who lived on a dairy farm about 5 miles from town. Big bonfire, food, lots and lots of beer, grass &c.  Everyone was drunk/stoned etc and no-one had the sense back then to stop anyone from driving. So I got on the bike, got it kick started, got the girl I was with on the back, and headed out the dirt farm lane carefully - no traffic. But on the paved 2 lane back to town when the cars started going by I realized I was seeing 4 headlights when there were actually only 2, and I couldn't focus. Somehow we made it back to my apt and turning into the gravel parking lot off the alley out in back the rear wheel just went out from under us, bike and us landing on the side. We were lucky to only have minor "road rash" and, actually, to still be alive after that trip. Replaced the broken turn signal and side cover, and never had even 1 beer when on the bike after that! That night did teach me a lesson!
Happy Motoring! from Roger in NY

Bill

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« #11 : May 04, 2021, 08:58:25 AM »
Gee Roger, you should be dead!  We are glad you survived that ordeal and wised up. I was boring growing up, all I did was go to school and starting at 13 work.  Maybe that's why at 70 I'm tired now.   :)

Bill


TC Chris

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« #12 : May 04, 2021, 07:18:54 PM »
You may have been young & boring, but I was young, boring, and stupid, at least when it came to rational driving habits.  Youth is a difficult time. We all want to be popular and successful and accomplished, and most of us fell short by all measures. Life gets much more pleasant when that insecure period is over and we can see that we have succeeded at some things, we have friends we value, and we have some knowledge.  The people who were most envied in high school have died or fizzled in various ways, while all those other boring people are the ones who has successful lives.  When you're young, nobody tells you how pleasurable maturity can be. Or maybe they do tell and young ears tune it out.  All I know is, being older is way better than being a kid.  At least I can look back and wonder how on earth I avoided killing myself via stupidity.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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« #13 : May 05, 2021, 07:46:56 AM »
It's interesting, Chris, with your comment about the "IN" crowd when we were in school.  I went to my first class reunion two years ago, it was number 50. A long time friend who, I have known since second grade, said I had to go.  If I said no he and his wife were going to drag me.  So I said yes.  Besides it was being held where it was a 5 minute walk from my house at the golf course country club.  I had fun, mostly just looking at all my fellow classmates and seeing how they changed.  Please, no one take this in a wrong way, but the "IN" crowd, jocks, etc., all looked terrible. Most of those guys I did not recognize.  The other guys, the ones that were the boring ones like me, pretty much still looked the same.  And, most of the girls looked pretty good.  Some hardly changed at all and I had no trouble recognizing them.  The other funny thing, just about everyone recognized me.  Other than being gray, I have not changed much.  It's funny how you take care of yourself what 50 years can do to you.

Bill

TC Chris

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« #14 : May 05, 2021, 05:41:56 PM »
I went to my 50th a few years back.  It was a really positive experience.  Also went to my 20th, another good one, and the 45th, a bust.  The 45th was bad because it was just old folks from the home town sitting with people they knew, not mixing at all, and faced inward so you couldn't see the name tags.  But the 20th & 50th both had mixing and greeting time. Lesson: ban tables!  Me, I'm not much of an extrovert, so the mixing part requires some determination, but it's rewarding to do it.

By the time you're going to a 20th, people's lives tend to be established and there's none of the competitive, zero-sum behavior from earlier years.   You can just be yourself.  It's a time to celebrate your fellow students' successes, whatever they may be, and to catch up on where their lives have gone.  Much of the fun was learning what people had accomplished and what they had done (especially by the 50th!).  I always encourage people to go to those events, even if it requires making yourself do it.

Chris Campbell