: Magnavox design  ( 554 )

TC Chris

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Magnavox design
« : June 07, 2021, 09:51:20 PM »
I was sitting and staring at the 1951 Maggie console where it's living downstate over the weekend.  Magnavox used very similar styles and hardware for a long time.  My '56 Provincial Serenade has the same frame-and-panel arch-top doors and the same hardware as the '51 model with slightly different proportions.  Then tonight I watched the short music video linked below and was fascinated by the antique furniture behind the 12-year-old guitarist.  Same lock escutcheon design as Maggie used; same arch-top panel doors.  Bet whoever designed the cabinets must have seen a similar piece.  Here's the link, and when you watch it, ask yourself what you had accomplished when you were 12.

https://fromthetop.org/video/daily-joy-12-year-old-plays-paraguayan-folk-tune/

Chris Campbell

Bill

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« #1 : June 08, 2021, 10:30:43 AM »
The furniture is interesting and I don't believe from the same era.  The desk to the left of the tall cabinet looks like something from early Americana, 1800's.  The tall cabinet looks much newer, maybe a replica of something?   As far as what I was doing when I was twelve, I was taking organ lessons, going to school, and during summer of my 12th year I road my bicycle 5 miles one way to the cherry orchard and picked cherries.  Those were the good ole' days.  ;)

Bill

TC Chris

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« #2 : June 08, 2021, 08:05:14 PM »
When I was 12 I had mastered eating and sleeping and little else.  Some of us are late bloomers, I guess.  Better late than never.  But I'm always amazed by these kids who are so advanced.

Chris Campbell

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« #3 : June 09, 2021, 05:09:37 PM »
At 12, I was getting some electronics lessons from my friends' dad who learned it in the Army but was now a maintenance foreman at a mill. It was once a week for like 6 months and I built a Heathkit VTVM while under supervision. I was stubborn and wanted to fix old tube stuff, so that was my first piece of test equipment. My dad paid him like $20 each time.

Otherwise no talent except for zero-ing in on 50-cent radios at the antiques flea markets and messing with TV antennas first, then the sets themselves.

Later when I was 14 - became the "whiz kid" who folks wanted to confirm the set was indeed dead as the shop told them it was not worth fixing. I was batting about .500 on those "basket cases" to the amazement of my parents and others that often reluctantly let me tinker with their stuff.

After all what did they have to lose if a supposed repairman told them it was done for.
Tubes - Magical - Tubes

Dave

TC Chris

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« #4 : June 09, 2021, 10:16:23 PM »
See, you were motivated and a self-starter.  Those are wonderful qualities.  Some people have them.  Some of us don't at 12, or 14, or 16....  Eventually I acquired some of those and learned things, but it was late. 

We Americans like to beat ourselves up for being unmotivated, but there are lots of people who are early bloomers and set good examples for the rest of us. 

I'm still working at 74 in part  because I've finally figured out how to do what I do for a living, and I'm pretty good at it, and it seems to be a shame to give up when I've got knowledge & skills.   On the radio stuff, no claims that I'm good at that, but I do have some grasp of the basics (finally) and a sense for how to make Ohm's Law work (finally).

But then along come these kid musicians who are so good at what they do....

Chris Campbell

Bill

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« #5 : June 10, 2021, 08:33:06 AM »
I guess I must have been one of those early bloomers, as I liked to work and make money.  At 14 I was working at the Gamble Store in downtown Hart doing everything they told me to do and having a ball doing it.  It was probably the best job I ever had.  It was constantly something different.  I arrived everyday after school, worked until the store closed at six, Fridays until nine, and then all day Saturday.  I did that all through High School and then on weekends and summer during my college years.  I even went back to work there after college just because I liked it so much.  My starting pay was $1.00 an hour and after one year of working there I got a raise.  Up, I was now in the big bucks, $1.25 an hour.  In todays world no one would even walk through the door for a dollar, but back in those days that was a good wage for a kid.  As I think back, that was probably some of the happiest times in my life.

Bill

 

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« #6 : June 10, 2021, 11:31:05 AM »
I'm always impressed by peers in my age group (early '70s) who are still able to, or wish to, work. With my advancing PMR I'm barely able to get up some days. In my late 50s was quite ready to retire from teaching science, as to do it right is a very high-energy -both physical and emotional - pursuit. My wife is one still working as a PA in family practice at 72, 3 days/week. She's on covid furlough at present but returns in August 3 days/wk. She'll work the rest of this year to transition her patients to a new provider, then hang it up for good Dec 31. I've been encouraging her to do so for a while but she really loves medicine and her patients. I know she's going to miss it, but she deserves a rest.

Chris I'm impressed by your dedication, both to biking year 'round and to still working at 74. If I may ask what do you do for work? It clearly is something you truly enjoy, so important to quality of life. I could not say the same for the last 10 years, kids/society had changed so much between 1972 and 2010 that by the end it was like working in a totally different career.
Happy Motoring! from Roger in NY

TC Chris

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« #7 : June 10, 2021, 08:41:31 PM »
I'm always impressed by peers in my age group (early '70s) who are still able to, or wish to, work. With my advancing PMR I'm barely able to get up some days. In my late 50s was quite ready to retire from teaching science, as to do it right is a very high-energy -both physical and emotional - pursuit. My wife is one still working as a PA in family practice at 72, 3 days/week. She's on covid furlough at present but returns in August 3 days/wk. She'll work the rest of this year to transition her patients to a new provider, then hang it up for good Dec 31. I've been encouraging her to do so for a while but she really loves medicine and her patients. I know she's going to miss it, but she deserves a rest.

Chris I'm impressed by your dedication, both to biking year 'round and to still working at 74. If I may ask what do you do for work? It clearly is something you truly enjoy, so important to quality of life. I could not say the same for the last 10 years, kids/society had changed so much between 1972 and 2010 that by the end it was like working in a totally different career.

Science teacher, huh?  I've taught science as a volunteer, on a schoolship, for 20 years.  I used to kid my teacher friends about their easy life, but once I started teaching all day I learned how damned hard it is, how demanding.  You have to be "on" all the time.

And the wife, a P.A.? Yesterday a P.A. got out the scalpel and carved the skin cancer out of my forearm (we hope), then stitched it up.  I just watched part of the dissection (hey, seeing your own flesh being cut away loses its charm pretty quickly) but the end result looks pretty good to me.

Me, I'm a lawyer at a legal aid office.  I've done it for most of 46 years, with a decade's detour into consumer-protection work.  We help poor people and old folks with divorces, evictions, bill collection cases, land disputes, and all manner of problems. No criminal cases, ever.  This is why I went to law school.  In old age I feel as though I know enough to be effective, finally.  I always hope that I've made a difference in people's lives.  Teachers do, for sure, even if they don't get the feedback they deserve.  At various times I've actually said thank-you to teachers--grade school high school, college--and they always seem gratified to know that somebody remembered their work.  Education is a great gift to the future.  Even those who are late bloomers like me and learned less than we should have were prepared for more learning later.  Life is so much more fun when you're earning new things.

Chris Campbell

firedome

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« #8 : June 11, 2021, 07:09:31 PM »
Chris I'm not surprised you're a lawyer as you're an excellent writer, all the while truly doing good works being active in that kind of lawyering, not always getting due recognition... long may you ride!

Folks of many talents and abilities here... I hope we can keep it going.
Happy Motoring! from Roger in NY

Bill

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« #9 : June 12, 2021, 08:17:36 AM »
A lawyer, Chris, I thought for some reason you worked for an insurance company.  On several occasions on the forum you had talked about Hagerty and working in an office.  I thought you worked for them.  I guess I should stop thinking.

Bill


TC Chris

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« #10 : June 28, 2021, 11:34:14 PM »
Hagerty's office complex is right here in downtown Traverse City.  In normal times I'd drive past it on the way back from my out-counties. They have a big display window that they circulate some cool cars through. That's where I saw the Bullitt Mustang, for example.  A new car is always an excuse to stop and go in and admire. It was one of the things that got me going on the Chevy.

It's now 16 months since I've driven to work.  16 months of riding the bike to work each day.  That's the big plus of the pandemic for me.  Everything that required driving is now done via Zoom.

Chris Campbell
P.S. why did your post show up as "new" today when it was posted June 12?

Bill

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« #11 : June 29, 2021, 02:06:29 PM »
I have no idea why it would show just today.  I did post back on June 12.  I wonder if that is part of the reason we are not getting a lot of responses, they just are not going thru?

Bill


TC Chris

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« #12 : June 29, 2021, 04:00:13 PM »
This one showed up on time.

Chris Campbell

Bill

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« #13 : June 30, 2021, 09:24:11 AM »
Hmmm....!

Bill